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Nuclide is a species of atom

  1. Feb 2, 2009 #1
    Hello,

    I'm fairly new with the nuclear physics, but I'm willing to study and learn as much as possible.

    I've been reading on wikipedia about the nuclides, but I couldn't understand what is the difference between an atom and a nuclide?

    On wikipedia they say that a nuclide is a species of atom, but what is the difference then?

    I can understand isotopoes, isobars, isotones, but I do not get the nuclides...

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2009 #2

    malawi_glenn

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    Re: Nuclide

    A nuclide is specified by its nucleus, an Oxogen atoms nucleus can for instance have different neutron content, so in this case the nuclide is called isotope. Atom is nuclide + electrons.
     
  4. Feb 2, 2009 #3

    Astronuc

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    Re: Nuclide

    A nuclide refers to a species of atom characterized by the constitution of its nucleus and hence by the number of protons, the number of neutrons, and the energy content.

    See chart of nuclides - http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/

    Zoom 1 (click on the 1 after clicking the cursor on any part of the chart) goes to the details on the atom
     
  5. Feb 3, 2009 #4
    Re: Nuclide

    Thank you malawi but I thought that nucleons where neoutrons + protons, and then nucleons + electrons = atoms

    As I said isotopes I understand, they are related to the same chemical element.

    I also understand that nuclide is a more general concept that includes isotopes, but I can't yet grasp it, as for example isotones, they have only a constant neutron number, thus the chemical element can vary, therefore for me, the nuclide concept is too broad, meaning it can be anything, any chemical element, in any combination of protons+neutron+electrons

    Thank for your answers!
     
  6. Feb 3, 2009 #5

    malawi_glenn

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    Re: Nuclide

    look at the chart of the nuclides which astronuc gave you - those are the NUCLIDES: all possible combinations of neutrons and protons which are found in nature. All nucleids with the same Z are called isotopes, and with same Z + N = A are called isobars and so on.

    It is not a too broad concept, it is like "fishes" -> You have different kinds of fishes..
     
  7. Feb 4, 2009 #6
    Re: Nuclide

    Malawi can you give an example of non-nuclide?
    I mean what is outside of the nuclide scope?
     
  8. Feb 4, 2009 #7

    malawi_glenn

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    Re: Nuclide

    in terms of protons and neutrons, nothing!

     
  9. Feb 4, 2009 #8
    Re: Nuclide

    Than would you agree with me in saying that nuclides sounds more like all living creatures, not only fish :), and than you have variations on the same species of animals (isotopes where the chemical element is the same, but the neutrons differ...)

    What is the difference between nuclides and atoms, can they be used interchangeably?
     
  10. Feb 4, 2009 #9

    malawi_glenn

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    Re: Nuclide

    I meant that fishes has different families and species....maybe you didn't know that ;-)

    Atom as electrons, an atom is nucleus + electrons.
     
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