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Partial/Complete charges and formal Charges?

  1. Jul 16, 2012 #1
    I'm reading the fundamentals of organic chemistry these days and I'd like to make sure I get the following absolutely right:

    1) If a certain atom in an ion or a molecule etc has a formal charge of zero then the atom itself has no charge on itself irrespective of whatever the charge might be overall on the ion or the molecule.

    2) If a certain atom in an ion or a molecule etc has a non-zero formal charge then the atom itself has a charge (a complete charge not a partial charge) on itself irrespective of whatever the charge might be on the complete ion or the molecule or even if the complete ion or molecule etc is neutral.

    3) However due to (differences of) polarity (irrespective of the formal charge), an atom in an ion or a molecule etc. may have a partial charge.

    Am I correct on all of the above three points?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 16, 2012 #2
    My bad. In the third point I meant to write electronegativity instead of polarity.
     
  4. Jul 16, 2012 #3
    You are correct.
     
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