Photon-Electron-Quanta: Explained Simply

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In summary: Photon is the only fundamental particle that we know of that is associated with the electromagnetic field.
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sinus
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I have three questions, and please can someone explain the answer as simple as possible.
1. What quanta means?
2. Why Planck said that energy is not continuous but quantized?
3. If we consideration light's behave as a particle, and photon is particle of the light, so is it true that not like the other particle that have electron, proton, and neutron, light only have foton? So foton is like the analogue of electron,proton and neutron? Or foton is just "particle's name" and it surely consist electron, proton and neutron.
 
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sinus said:
1. What quanta means?
Quanta is the plural of Quantum, which, according to wikipedia, means: In physics, a quantum (plural quanta) is the minimum amount of any physical entity (physical property) involved in an interaction.

sinus said:
2. Why Planck said that energy is not continuous but quantized?
This is only true in certain contexts. The possible kinetic energy an object can have in free space is not quantized, but continuous. However, the energy given up by light of a certain wavelength upon absorption is quantized, meaning that it is transferred only in discrete amounts, not by continual transfer of energy. So, in other words, light with a wavelength of 500 nm that is absorbed by an object will repeatedly transfer about 2.48 eV of energy to that object, with light of a higher intensity having more 'deposits' per second than less intense light.

sinus said:
3. If we consideration light's behave as a particle, and photon is particle of the light, so is it true that not like the other particle that have electron, proton, and neutron, light only have foton? So foton is like the analogue of electron,proton and neutron? Or foton is just "particle's name" and it surely consist electron, proton and neutron.
The fundamental particle associated with the electromagnetic field, and by extension the electromagnetic force, is called the photon. It is distinctly different than electrons, protons, and neutrons. The latter two aren't even fundamental particles, but composite particles.
 
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Related to Photon-Electron-Quanta: Explained Simply

1. What is a photon?

A photon is a fundamental particle of light that carries energy and has no mass. It is the basic unit of electromagnetic radiation and is responsible for all forms of light, including visible light, radio waves, x-rays, and gamma rays.

2. What is an electron?

An electron is a subatomic particle that carries a negative charge and orbits around the nucleus of an atom. It is one of the building blocks of matter and is responsible for many important properties of atoms, including their chemical and electrical behavior.

3. What is a quantum?

A quantum is the smallest possible unit of energy that can exist independently. It is also used to describe the discrete nature of matter and energy at the atomic and subatomic level, where particles can only exist in specific energy states.

4. How are photons, electrons, and quanta related?

Photons and electrons are both fundamental particles that make up the universe. Photons are responsible for carrying energy and creating electromagnetic waves, while electrons are responsible for creating and maintaining the structure of matter. Quanta, on the other hand, are the discrete units of energy that make up photons and electrons.

5. Why is it important to understand photon-electron-quanta interactions?

Understanding the interactions between photons, electrons, and quanta is crucial in many fields of science, including quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular physics, and materials science. It allows us to explain and predict the behavior of matter and energy at the smallest scales and has led to numerous technological advancements, such as lasers and transistors.

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