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Programs Physics foundation courses?

Are there any foundation courses in physics for people who don't have any science background and want to do a masters? I last studied physics, chem, bio, math in high school, and then did a grad and post-grad in journalism. I have been learning through the Khan Academy and other online courses, but would like to get a formal education, without having to spend three to four years on an undergrad if possible. That would turn out to be really expensive. [And apologies for those who might find this repetitive, I did ask a similar question earlier, but I am specifically looking for course/program suggestions this time.]
 

Choppy

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would like to get a formal education, without having to spend three to four years on an undergrad if possible.
The thing is, a formal education in physics IS an undergraduate degree in physics. And that usually requires four years of study. You might be able to knock off a year by getting credit for electives, but in most cases the courses need to be done in sequence for them to make sense, so it's not really practical to condense the courses much further.
 

jtbell

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I see from your earlier posts that you're in India. In the US, one could conceivably enroll in a university as a non-degree-seeking student, and take the necessary undergraduate physics and math courses individually. This wouldn't lead to a diploma that says "B.S. in physics", but the courses and your grades would be listed on the academic record (transcript) which has to be submitted anyway when applying for graduate school. In the US, I think this might work, although I don't remember reading about anyone who actually did it this way. I have no idea whether this would work in India or whatever other country you're planning to study in.

As Choppy noted, even if you take only physics and math courses, you'd probably still need three years because of the sequencing of courses and prerequisites.
 
The thing is, a formal education in physics IS an undergraduate degree in physics. And that usually requires four years of study. You might be able to knock off a year by getting credit for electives, but in most cases the courses need to be done in sequence for them to make sense, so it's not really practical to condense the courses much further.
That's what I'm hearing from most people, unfortunately. Thanks for your comment! Bests.
 
I see from your earlier posts that you're in India. In the US, one could conceivably enroll in a university as a non-degree-seeking student, and take the necessary undergraduate physics and math courses individually. This wouldn't lead to a diploma that says "B.S. in physics", but the courses and your grades would be listed on the academic record (transcript) which has to be submitted anyway when applying for graduate school. In the US, I think this might work, although I don't remember reading about anyone who actually did it this way. I have no idea whether this would work in India or whatever other country you're planning to study in.

As Choppy noted, even if you take only physics and math courses, you'd probably still need three years because of the sequencing of courses and prerequisites.
Yes, that's a big problem. Science education is great in India, and I'd much rather study here (so much cheaper!). But there is no real concept of community colleges here.

Thanks for your comment!
 

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