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Pka vs ph

  1. Oct 14, 2005 #1
    I have a question about pka and pH say that the pka of Acetic acid is 4.7 and the ph of the solution is 3.5, that means that the solution is acidic so it wants to donate protons, would that mean that Acetic acid in this solution would be in the protonated form, that means it will not donate it H. Say if pH was no 5.0 which is still acidic but its larger than the pka so that means that Acetic acid is going to be in the deprotonated form. Am i getting this right, if not can someone plz clear this up for me. Ive always had a hard time with this concept.

  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 14, 2005 #2


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    well assuming a pure acetic acid solution, at a pH of 3.5, you'll have mostly the acidic form of acetic acid. Think of it in terms of rate dynamics.
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