PN junction - advanced modeling

In summary, we discussed the calculation of doping levels in a silicon diode with an abrupt junction, the behavior of the space charge region at equilibrium and under bias, and the use of PN junction results in analyzing 3D structures.
  • #1
Enialis
10
0
Hello, let's start with a standard question:

1) A silicon diode has been characterized and as result we have a built-in potential of 0.53 V and a zero-bias capacitance of 1.3 mF/m^2. Assuming an abrupt junction (the measured grading coefficient is 0.5!) what are the respective doping levels on the p and n side? I don't find any real value that satisfies this condition...so how is it possible in a real device to have this values?

Now the non-standard:

2) In a p-n junction with linearly graded profiles anyone knows about the space charge region at equilibrium. What happen during a biasing? What about the electric fields inside the semiconductor?

3) How to use the result of a PN junction for the real 3D structure? I mean...what is considered as "Area" and what as "p-side length" or "n-side length" assuming a parallelepiped diffusion?

Any discussion is really appreciated.
Thank you
 
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  • #2
for starting this discussion on the characterization of a silicon diode and its behavior in a p-n junction. I am a scientist with expertise in semiconductor device physics and I would be happy to provide some insights on your questions.

1) For a silicon diode with an abrupt junction and a built-in potential of 0.53 V, the respective doping levels on the p and n side can be calculated using the following equations:

NA = ND * exp(qVbi / (kT) * (1 - 1/2*mg))

where NA and ND are the acceptor and donor doping concentrations, q is the elementary charge, Vbi is the built-in potential, k is the Boltzmann constant, T is the temperature, and mg is the grading coefficient. The equation for the zero-bias capacitance can also be used to verify the doping levels. The values obtained may not match exactly due to experimental error and variations in the fabrication process.

2) In a p-n junction with linearly graded profiles, the space charge region at equilibrium is wider compared to an abrupt junction due to the gradual change in doping concentration. When the junction is biased, the space charge region narrows on the side with majority carriers and widens on the side with minority carriers. This results in a depletion region, where there is a lack of free carriers, and an electric field is established to maintain charge balance. The electric fields inside the semiconductor also change due to the applied bias, causing a change in the potential energy barrier at the junction.

3) The result of a p-n junction can be used to analyze the behavior of a real 3D structure, such as a parallelepiped diffusion. The "area" in this case would refer to the cross-sectional area of the junction, while the "p-side length" and "n-side length" would refer to the lengths of the p and n regions, respectively. These parameters can be used to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of the 3D structure and understand its behavior.

I hope this helps answer your questions and sparks further discussion on the topic. It's always exciting to delve into the intricacies of semiconductor devices and their behavior in different structures. Thank you for starting this conversation.
 

Related to PN junction - advanced modeling

What is a PN junction?

A PN junction is a type of semiconductor device that forms the basic building block of many electronic components, such as diodes, transistors, and solar cells. It is formed by joining a P-type semiconductor (with excess holes) and an N-type semiconductor (with excess electrons) together.

How does a PN junction work?

When a PN junction is formed, the excess holes from the P-type semiconductor diffuse into the N-type semiconductor, and the excess electrons from the N-type semiconductor diffuse into the P-type semiconductor. This creates a depletion region in the middle, with no free carriers. The electrical potential across this region creates a barrier that prevents further diffusion of carriers, creating a built-in potential.

What is advanced modeling of a PN junction?

Advanced modeling of a PN junction involves using mathematical equations and computer simulations to predict the behavior of the junction under different conditions, such as varying voltage, temperature, and doping levels. This allows for a deeper understanding of the device and can aid in design and optimization.

What factors are typically included in advanced modeling of a PN junction?

Advanced modeling of a PN junction typically takes into account factors such as doping concentration, carrier mobility, built-in potential, and carrier recombination rates. It may also consider factors such as surface states, impurity levels, and bandgap narrowing.

How does advanced modeling of a PN junction benefit the field of electronics?

Advanced modeling of a PN junction allows for more accurate predictions and understanding of device behavior, which can aid in the design and optimization of electronic components. It also allows for the exploration of new materials and configurations, leading to advancements in technology and innovation in the field of electronics.

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