Question about a dipole.

  • #1
MathematicalPhysicist
Gold Member
4,309
217
let's say we have an electron circling the nucleus (like the bohr's hydrogen atom), i dont understand why the average wrt to time of the moment of the diople is zero?
we have this equation: [tex]\frac{\int_{0}^{T}pdt}{T}[/tex]
well obviously the diople, p, is constant throughout the elctron's motion, and it ahs the value p=eR where e is the electro's charge and R is the radius of motion, so unless im missing something the average should be eR, so why am i wrong here?

thanks in advance.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
529
1
The dipole is a vector.
 
  • #3
MathematicalPhysicist
Gold Member
4,309
217
i know that it's defined as a vector which its direction is along the radius, does it mean that on the whole circle the vectors cancel eachother, obviously they do.
thanks.
 
  • #4
529
1
i know that it's defined as a vector which its direction is along the radius, does it mean that on the whole circle the vectors cancel eachother, obviously they do.
thanks.
Yes. The atom has an instantaneous, but not a permanent dipole.
 

Related Threads on Question about a dipole.

Replies
2
Views
5K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
735
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
607
Replies
11
Views
2K
Top