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Question about a dipole.

  1. Apr 10, 2007 #1

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    let's say we have an electron circling the nucleus (like the bohr's hydrogen atom), i dont understand why the average wrt to time of the moment of the diople is zero?
    we have this equation: [tex]\frac{\int_{0}^{T}pdt}{T}[/tex]
    well obviously the diople, p, is constant throughout the elctron's motion, and it ahs the value p=eR where e is the electro's charge and R is the radius of motion, so unless im missing something the average should be eR, so why am i wrong here?

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 10, 2007 #2
    The dipole is a vector.
     
  4. Apr 10, 2007 #3

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    i know that it's defined as a vector which its direction is along the radius, does it mean that on the whole circle the vectors cancel eachother, obviously they do.
    thanks.
     
  5. Apr 10, 2007 #4
    Yes. The atom has an instantaneous, but not a permanent dipole.
     
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