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LaTeX Question About Latex

  1. Feb 9, 2015 #1
    How do you write on latex like this

    ##A = (1+2) * (4+7) * (2+9)##
    ##= 3 * 11 * 11##
    ##= 363##

    Instead of this?

    ##A = (1+2) * (4+7) * (2+9)
    = 3 * 11 * 11
    = 363##

    How do you align at = in Latex?

    I would like to use Latex which is used in physicsforums in my PC. Please send me the download link.

    Thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 9, 2015 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    The double backslash gets you a newline, and you can align equations using the "align" environment.
    A multiplication sign is \times.
    You can also size the parentheses.

    What you asked for:
    $$A=(1+2)(4+7)(2+9) \\=3\times 11\times 11 \\= 363$$


    Using the align environment and sizing the parentheses:
    $$\begin{align} A &=\big(1+2\big)\big(4+7\big)\big(2+9\big) \\ &=3\times 11\times 11 \\ &= 363 \end{align}$$

    If you are going to be using LaTeX more (recommended) then you'll need a decent guidebook:
    https://tobi.oetiker.ch/lshort/lshort.pdf < this is what I use
    http://latex.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page < wiki format
     
  4. Feb 10, 2015 #3
    For LaTeX on PC, the standard and probably easiest way to go is Miktex It contains the latex engine, simple editor and previewer.
     
  5. Feb 10, 2015 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    Oh yeah...
    http://latex-project.org/ftp.html
    ... see the latex project for more.

    There's also a short intro on the help page...
    https://www.physicsforums.com/help/

    LaTeX is a complete document typesetting system, not just for typesetting maths.
    Using it in place of the built-in equation editor in a wysiwig editor like word is a bit more involved.

    I use commandline with TexLive myself... but then it comes with the os.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2015
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