Quick Flyback Convertor Question

  • Thread starter crystalbrite
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In summary, the polarity of v2 on the secondary winding changes in a flyback convertor compared to a normal transformer circuit. This is due to the way the wire is wrapped around the transformer core, causing a different direction of voltage and current in the secondary. However, the effect on the primary remains the same in both cases.
  • #1
crystalbrite
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In a flyback convertor, why does the polarity of v2 on the secondary winding change compared to a normal transformer circuit as shown in the picture attached?

If the voltage and current, v1 and I1 in the primary winding are flowing in the same direction in both circuits shouldn't the polarity of the induced voltage and current v2 and I2 be the same polarity in both circuits?
 

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  • #2
Is the direction of the voltage and current in the secondary just due to the way the wire has been wrapped around the transformer core as I have drawn in the picture attached?
 

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  • #3
crystalbrite said:
Is the direction of the voltage and current in the secondary just due to the way the wire has been wrapped around the transformer core as I have drawn in the picture attached?

The sense of the secondary current would be different for different connections but the effect on the primary ('back emf') would be the same in each case.
 

1. What is a Quick Flyback Converter?

A Quick Flyback Converter is an electronic circuit that converts high voltage, low current power to low voltage, high current power. It uses a transformer to store energy and then releases it in a controlled manner to the output circuit.

2. How does a Quick Flyback Converter work?

A Quick Flyback Converter works by using a transistor to rapidly switch the input voltage on and off. This switching action creates a high frequency AC signal that is then fed through a transformer. The transformer steps down the voltage and increases the current, creating the desired output.

3. What are the advantages of using a Quick Flyback Converter?

Quick Flyback Converters are compact, low cost, and efficient. They also offer isolation between the input and output circuits, making them suitable for high voltage applications. Additionally, their output voltage can easily be regulated by changing the duty cycle of the switching transistor.

4. What are the main applications of a Quick Flyback Converter?

Quick Flyback Converters are commonly used in low power applications such as in consumer electronics, LED lighting, and battery chargers. They are also used in high voltage applications such as in television sets and telecommunications equipment.

5. What are the potential challenges when designing a Quick Flyback Converter?

Some potential challenges when designing a Quick Flyback Converter include managing the high voltage levels and ensuring proper isolation between the input and output circuits. There may also be issues with electromagnetic interference and the selection of appropriate components to achieve the desired output. Proper design and testing are important in overcoming these challenges.

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