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Rand cam engine

  1. Mar 24, 2006 #1

    wolram

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  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 24, 2006 #2
    wow, thats cool. see its stuff like this that makes me wonder why im becoming an engineer, every time i see something like this there is one less thing for me to invent, and i always feel like that idea is much ebtter than mine
     
  4. Mar 24, 2006 #3

    wolram

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    I have read that this engine can be made entirly of ceramics, and may be used for powering spy planes, due to its low radar reflection and quiteness
    of opperation.
     
  5. Mar 24, 2006 #4
  6. Mar 24, 2006 #5

    Danger

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    Maybe it's just because of my not-so-great eyesight, but I can't quite determine the method of operation. Is that cam essentially a ramped piston that rotates by a wedge effect of the combustion gas? I wish that there was a more detailed set of pictures, and maybe an animation.
     
  7. Mar 24, 2006 #6

    wolram

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    Danger, look at this site for animation.

    http://www.regtech.com/93.html
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2006
  8. Mar 24, 2006 #7

    FredGarvin

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    It is interesting. I like the concept and easy is always better. I would like to see some power curves before I jump to too many conclusions. However, with their stock at $.40 or so per share, this might be a great low cost stock to get in on the ground floor.

    BTW...that company should never have let that mechanic be interviewed on that video. His portions were horrendous to listen to.
     
  9. Mar 24, 2006 #8
    sealing = HUGE problem like the wankel.
     
  10. Mar 25, 2006 #9

    wolram

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    I think the intension of building this engine from ceramics may over come
    sealing problems, running clearances of 2 micron have been mentioned, in
    other applications. if industry can mass produce to this level of accuracy
    cheaply, (in comparison to a piston engine) is another matter.
     
  11. Mar 25, 2006 #10
    Yes but
    1) It would likely never be able to provide the type of sealing quality as in piston engines. Besides more sealing will be required than the piston. Piston requires sealing only on circumference. This one requires in on all sides of the vane.

    2) I previously studied this rotary vane engine concept. In one of the patents, a problem mentioned was that when the vane uncovers the hole and the gases flow through, the hot gases will corrode the seal(if present) and the vane.
    Over time this could be a major problem in this one especially since the corrosion will be taking place throughout the cycle of the engine.

    3) Ceramics would be costlier than steel and aluminum. And they would require grinding and hot pressing to shape which is expensive though that might be partially offset by the lower number of parts.

    4) Market scope:- I would say virtually zero because
    a. no added advantage over the piston except power.
    b. possibly expense
    c. lack of research while the piston has been researched for over 120 years
    d. MAJOR interest in fuel cells
    e. restructuring of manufacturing equipment and tech know-how.
     
  12. Mar 25, 2006 #11

    Danger

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    Thanks for the link, Woolie. It makes sense now, except that I can't figure out why the part labelled 'rotor' is apparently the only thing not rotating. I was about to ask where the hell the sparkplug screws in, until I reread the part that said it's a diesel. :redface: How to start it without a glowplug, though?
     
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