Random, sad comments you have heard in public settings?

  • #1
Comment made by an 11 year old accompanied by her grandmother after she entered the Subway I was eating at, somewhere in The Bronx, NY:

"Why would I want to learn math? Just so I can work at a cash register?"

I wanted to cry...:frown:

Where would she get that idea from?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
loseyourname
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Calculating transaction change is often a justification for learning middle school math that I've heard given my middle school math teachers. That is, when students ask what the point is, the teacher will give an example like that. The girl was probably told something like that.

I think it's much sadder when a poor corner kid gets the idea he should quit school entirely because everyone he knows in the neighborhood ends up dead or in prison by the age of 20 anyway, so why should he expect to end up any differently?
 
  • #3
Ivan Seeking
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I think it's much sadder when a poor corner kid gets the idea he should quit school entirely because everyone he knows in the neighborhood ends up dead or in prison by the age of 20 anyway, so why should he expect to end up any differently?

Or, "why should I get a job when I can make $2K a week selling drugs".
 
  • #4
"Hey, is anyone here <insert ethnic group, religious group, sexual orientation, etc>? No? OK, I've got a great joke...."

That's a bit general, but specifically, one that blew me away was: "I'm all about non-violence, but sometimes a ***** needs to be smacked."
 
  • #5
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this thread reminds me! I was just reading it actually (see how eventful my life is :p) search for overheard in new york, or overheard in London. funny...
 
  • #6
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During a recent hair cut I heard a man, within three minutes, tell his female stylist: "I support breast cancer, protect the boobies" (which doesn't even make sense), "shower you with my pheromones" and "you should wear a tuxedo t-shirt". weirdo!
 
  • #7
lisab
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During a recent hair cut I heard a man, within three minutes, tell his female stylist: "I support breast cancer, protect the boobies" (which doesn't even make sense), "shower you with my pheromones" and "you should wear a tuxedo t-shirt". weirdo!

Eeew :yuck:. I'm so glad I don't have to deal with the general public in my job.
 
  • #8
During a recent hair cut I heard a man, within three minutes, tell his female stylist: "I support breast cancer, protect the boobies" (which doesn't even make sense), "shower you with my pheromones" and "you should wear a tuxedo t-shirt". weirdo!

I assume at the 4 minute mark you heard an officer say, "place your hands on your head... interlace your fingers.." I HOPE. What a perv.
 
  • #9
Calculating transaction change is often a justification for learning middle school math that I've heard given my middle school math teachers. That is, when students ask what the point is, the teacher will give an example like that. The girl was probably told something like that.

Ok, that makes sense. I think a better example could be used but then again I do not know what careers kids that age find attractive.

I think it's much sadder when a poor corner kid gets the idea he should quit school entirely because everyone he knows in the neighborhood ends up dead or in prison by the age of 20 anyway, so why should he expect to end up any differently?

Or, "why should I get a job when I can make $2K a week selling drugs".

I witness this and more on a regular basis. At least once I heard a woman encouraging a young girl of about 16 to "get pregnant to get welfare and an apartment." I do not know how many of you have lived and/or witnessed life in the lower socioeconomic levels, but there are a lot of people with truly warped, sad, depressing views of life. :frown:
 
  • #10
Ok, that makes sense. I think a better example could be used but then again I do not know what careers kids that age find attractive.





I witness this and more on a regular basis. At least once I heard a woman encouraging a young girl of about 16 to "get pregnant to get welfare and an apartment." I do not know how many of you have lived and/or witnessed life in the lower socioeconomic levels, but there are a lot of people with truly warped, sad, depressing views of life. :frown:

I believe that people don't appreciate the isolation, and traumas of growing in such environments... it only takes a few generations for touch with what most consider "reality" to be lost. So many live in a kind of fantasy, waiting for "the end of days" or some Muslim or Latino invasion. Others are taught that hope is pointless, and plenty never CONSIDER a life beyond what they see because... well... there's no one to tell them that there's more to life.

This is what it means to have a failed educational system.
 
  • #11
Ivan Seeking
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I believe that people don't appreciate the isolation, and traumas of growing in such environments... it only takes a few generations for touch with what most consider "reality" to be lost. So many live in a kind of fantasy, waiting for "the end of days" or some Muslim or Latino invasion. Others are taught that hope is pointless, and plenty never CONSIDER a life beyond what they see because... well... there's no one to tell them that there's more to life.

This is what it means to have a failed educational system.

Gotta say it. Imo, much of this is fueled by the drug laws. There is an entire country within a country operating outside of the law. This creates an invisible economy, an invisible social structure, gang-law enforcement, and it places a wall between the underclass and drug users, and the rest of society. And it is all driven by the street value of the drugs, which are exceedingly high because they are illegal.

It isn't about the drugs, it is about the money!

Consider this:
A senior U.S. intelligence official told ABCNews.com the approximate estimate of 100 al Qaeda members left in Afghanistan reflects the conclusion of American intelligence agencies and the Defense Department.

...Intelligence officials estimate there are several hundred al Qaeda fighters just across the border in Pakistan...
http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/president-obamas-secret-100-al-qaeda-now-afghanistan/story?id=9227861

On the other hand, MS13, a once small but brutal gang that terrorized the streets of Los Angeles, has, through the use of drug laws, grown into an international organization.

"The gang is estimated to have 30,000 to 50,000 members and associate members worldwide, 8,000 to 10,000 of whom reside in the United States".[10]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mara_Salvatrucha

We are also funding what is now looking like an insurgency, in Mexico.

Drug-related violence in Mexico increasingly has the hallmarks of an insurgency, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has said...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-11234058
 
  • #12
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I remember once a BBC interview with a teenager who was caught in smuggling drugs across the US border. The boy claimed that drug related jobs are much more attractive than studying/schools. Not only they manage to make good money, buy cars etc but also become more popular among other teenagers.

I am not sure if it was this boy:
http://articles.cnn.com/2009-04-21/justice/teen.drug.smugglers_1_drug-cartels-border-checkpoints-smuggling?_s=PM:CRIME [Broken]
 
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  • #13
CRGreathouse
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Or, "why should I get a job when I can make $2K a week selling drugs".

Unlikely.
 
  • #14
Gotta say it. Imo, much of this is fueled by the drug laws. There is an entire country within a country operating outside of the law. This creates an invisible economy, an invisible social structure, gang-law enforcement, and it places a wall between the underclass and drug users, and the rest of society. And it is all driven by the street value of the drugs, which are exceedingly high because they are illegal.

It isn't about the drugs, it is about the money!

Consider this:

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/president-obamas-secret-100-al-qaeda-now-afghanistan/story?id=9227861

On the other hand, MS13, a once small but brutal gang that terrorized the streets of Los Angeles, has, through the use of drug laws, grown into an international organization.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mara_Salvatrucha

We are also funding what is now looking like an insurgency, in Mexico.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-11234058

Indeed, and not just an underground economy, but truly a country as you say. The addicts, and the dealers, and then the people both brush against, steal from, or harm in the quest to move, produce, sell, and take drugs.

CRGreathouse: Definitely an unlikely figure for a street level dealer, but that doesn't mean it isn't an image that draws in recruits, and given the "pyramid" nature of most gangs, it's not impossible if you live long enough. Grim, but true.
 

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