Real Life Situations? Static vs. Kinetic friction

In summary, static friction is the force that keeps objects in place, while kinetic friction slows down or stops objects already in motion. These types of friction are present in various real life situations and are affected by factors such as surface types, applied force, and use of lubricants. The coefficient of friction is a measurement of the amount of friction and can be higher or lower depending on the situation. In most cases, static friction is greater than kinetic friction, but there are exceptions.
  • #1
JChoi137
1
0
Real Life Situations?

Hey everybody. I was just wondering if there are any real life situations where the static friction of an object will ALWAYS be greater than the kinetic friction. Please let me know! Thanks!
-J
 
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  • #2
Just about any application of dry friction between surfaces will satisfy that requirement. I challenge you to find an example where kinetic friction exceeds the maximum static friction.
 
  • #3
Your example would be drag, of some form. At sufficient velocities, I imagine every pair of dry surfaces can eventually have kinetic friction exceeding maximum static.
 

Related to Real Life Situations? Static vs. Kinetic friction

1. What is the difference between static and kinetic friction?

Static friction is the force that prevents an object from moving when a force is applied, while kinetic friction is the force that opposes the motion of an already moving object. In other words, static friction keeps objects in place, while kinetic friction slows down or stops objects that are already in motion.

2. How do static and kinetic friction affect real life situations?

Static and kinetic friction are present in almost all real life situations involving objects in contact. For example, static friction allows us to walk without slipping, while kinetic friction is why we slide to a stop when we run. In industries such as transportation and manufacturing, understanding and managing these types of friction is crucial for efficiency and safety.

3. What factors affect the amount of static and kinetic friction?

The amount of static and kinetic friction depends on the types of surfaces in contact, the force applied, and the presence of any lubricants. Rougher surfaces typically have higher amounts of friction, while smoother surfaces have lower amounts. Additionally, the force applied and the use of lubricants can also affect the amount of friction present.

4. How does the coefficient of friction relate to static and kinetic friction?

The coefficient of friction is a measurement of the amount of friction between two surfaces. It is used to describe both static and kinetic friction and is affected by the type of surfaces in contact and the force applied. A higher coefficient of friction means there is more friction present, while a lower coefficient means there is less friction.

5. Can static friction ever be greater than kinetic friction?

Yes, in most cases, static friction is greater than kinetic friction. This is because the force required to overcome static friction and initiate motion is typically greater than the force needed to maintain motion once it has started. However, in certain situations such as a car sliding on a wet road, kinetic friction may be greater than static friction.

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