Record Heat for the Oceans in 2022

In summary: Wildfires in eastern Canada are affecting air quality, and they may continue to do so for the next few days. The blazes are burning in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and they have already emitted more than 680,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide. The smoke from the fires is also reaching into the United States.The fires are expected to continue for the next few days, and there is a risk of them spreading. The smoke from the fires is causing air quality to decline in parts of the United States, and people who are sensitive to air pollution should take precautions.
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pinball1970
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From the abstract. "In 2022, the world’s oceans, as given by OHC, were again the hottest in the historical record and exceeded the previous 2021 record maximum."
"Changes in ocean heat content (OHC), salinity, and stratification provide critical indicators for changes in Earth’s energy and water cycles. These cycles have been profoundly altered due to the emission of greenhouse gasses and other anthropogenic substances by human activities, driving pervasive changes in Earth’s climate system. In 2022, the world’s oceans, as given by OHC, were again the hottest in the historical record and exceeded the previous 2021 record maximum. According to IAP/CAS data, the 0–2000 m OHC in 2022 exceeded that of 2021 by 10.9 ± 8.3 ZJ (1 Zetta Joules = 1021 Joules); and according to NCEI/NOAA data, by 9.1 ± 8.7 ZJ. Among seven regions, four basins (the North Pacific, North Atlantic, the Mediterranean Sea, and southern oceans) recorded their highest OHC since the 1950s."

Paper: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00376-023-2385-2

As of May 2023: https://climatereanalyzer.org/clim/sst_daily/
 
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I wonder whether there is a table somewher that translates energy / temperature into expansion of volume / sea level rise.
 
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fresh_42 said:
I wonder whether there is a table somewher that translates energy / temperature into expansion of volume / sea level rise.
I had look and I found this for water (not sea water)

https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/water-specific-volume-weight-d_661.html?vA=20&units=C

1C rise equates to 0.0002 Cm³ increase in volume if you look at the second graph in Fahrenheit. I took a tenth of the 60-70 increase.

361 million sqr km of Ocean on the planet.

The Salt in sea water will make the boiling higher so the expansion will be lower I guess.
 
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fresh_42 said:
I wonder whether there is a table somewher that translates energy / temperature into expansion of volume / sea level rise.
Chemical Oceanography, Riley & Skirrow, vol. 1, p. 103.
 
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Related to the warming ocean - some inland areas are drier than normal, especially up in Canada. Surprising is the unusual hot dry weather in eastern Canada, particularly in Nova Scotia.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2023/05/30/canada-nova-scotia-fire-smoke/
Wildfires in southeastern Canada’s Nova Scotia province have damaged or destroyed 200 homes near Halifax while forcing more than 16,000 people to evacuate. Thick plumes of smoke are also finding their way into the northeastern United States.

The expansive fires in Nova Scotia are of unusual intensity for the region, fueled by abnormally hot and dry weather. Some places have seen little to no rain this month, and much of the maritime zone was already abnormally dry as of late April.

Of the fires burning in Nova Scotia, the largest is over 24,700 acres (10,000 hectares) and is still out of control.

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wildfires-eastern-canada-affecting-air-quality-major-us/story?id=99723443
 
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