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I References on thermal power stations and supercritical technology

  1. Mar 20, 2017 #1
    Hi. This is technically an assignment question, but it's not really a problem that I have to solve. It's more of an investigation so I thought this would be a more appropriate place to discuss it.

    The question basically asks you to compare the thermodynamic cycle of water in a typical thermal power station versus one using 'ultra-supercritical technology'. I've looked around on the internet and got the basic idea of how each type of plant works as well as the main differentiator, that no phase transition in a supercritial reactor leads to higher efficiency.

    However, I can't use much of this online material as a source in the assignment, and I'm finding it difficult to find reputable references to read up on the topic. Anything would do; books, papers, official web pages.

    Also, if there is any aspect of this discussion that you think deserves special attention I would appreciate any and all pointers. Currently we are working on quantifying the entropy of Einstein solids and ideal gases as well as the definition of temperature in terms of the entropy of a system, however I think as far as this investigation is concerned applications of the first law are what is being sought after.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 20, 2017 #2

    anorlunda

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    It is very unclear what specific info you seek. But for first law principles, can't you do it with just a Mollier Chart instead of a real power plant?
    It is not common to publish the detailed thermal design of power plants in open literature.
     
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