Relativity and the Constant Velocity of Light

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In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of relativity and the constant velocity of light in a vacuum. The question of whether this is due to the uniformity of vacuum and if the same applies to other materials is raised. The expert clarifies that the theory of relativity is based on the constant speed of light in a vacuum and is not affected by the speed of light in other materials.
  • #1
dock
there goes another relativity!

as some member stated:
"the velocity of light is constant in vacuum"

i wonder:

"is it because the vacuum is all alike?"

"would the velocity of light be constant in same kind of waters?"

"would we have to define new theories for relativity then?"
 
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  • #2
I consider vacumn to be the absence of material particles (materials composed of atoms) so yes all vacumn is the same.

Of course light takes more time to transit a given distance in the presence of atomic material. Haven't you read a single thread concerning this? There are many.

Just like if you are dirving at 35km/h, it takes longer to go the same distance if you must stop a traffic lights every intersection then if there are no lights.

The theory of Relativity was derived with the speed of light in vacumn constant as a fundamental postulate. The speed of light in materials does not have any effect on this.

Be careful where you take this thread Dock!
 
  • #3
clarifying thought

The principle of relativity by itself doesn't have to do anything with material(or absence of it) through which light travels. It simply(sic!) states that light travels with the constant velocity ( := c) in all frames of reference which move with constant speeds in respect to each other.
 

What is "There goes another relativity"?

"There goes another relativity" is a phrase often used in physics and refers to the concept of relativity, which is a fundamental theory that explains how objects move in space and time.

What is the significance of relativity?

Relativity is significant because it challenged and revolutionized our understanding of space and time. It also forms the basis for many other scientific theories, such as quantum mechanics and cosmology.

Who developed the theory of relativity?

The theory of relativity was developed by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century. He published two theories of relativity: the special theory of relativity in 1905 and the general theory of relativity in 1915.

What is the difference between special and general relativity?

The special theory of relativity deals with objects moving at constant speeds in the absence of gravity, while the general theory of relativity takes into account the effects of gravity on objects in motion. The general theory of relativity also provides a deeper understanding of the curvature of space and time.

How has relativity been proven?

Relativity has been proven through numerous experiments and observations. For example, the famous Michelson-Morley experiment in 1887 provided evidence for the special theory of relativity, and the observation of gravitational lensing in 1919 supported the general theory of relativity.

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