Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: Root Mean Square Error, a straight line fit, and gradient issue

  1. Apr 11, 2010 #1

    K29

    User Avatar

    I have some measurements from a physics lab experiment and I am coding in Matlab a fit for the data. [Note this is not a problem with Matlab, my problem here is theory]

    In normal regression of statistics the RMSE is given by:

    [tex]s=\frac{\sigma}{\sqrt{n}} =\sqrt{\frac{\Sigma (\epsilon _i)^2}{n(n-1)}}[/tex]
    where [tex] \sigma [/tex] is the standard deviation or Root Mean Square Deviation.

    Now, according to my physics lab manual:

    "For large n the standard error of the mean implies 68% confidence interval. For small n this is not reliable and it is necessary to multiply [tex]\sigma[/tex] by a certain factor t, to obtain the appropriate confidence interval."

    They then give a table with t= 12.7 for n = 2; t = 4.3 for n =3 (t is reduced by a factor of 1/3.6 for each n)

    Onwards...

    The root mean square error for the straight line fit is given by:
    [tex]S_{y}=\sqrt{\frac{\Sigma(\delta y_{i}^{2})}{n-2}}[/tex]

    The error in the gradient of the straight line fit is:
    [tex]S_{m}=S_{y}\sqrt{\frac{\Sigma x_{i}^{2}}{n \Sigma (x_{i}^{2})-(\Sigma x_{i})^2 }}[/tex]

    Now for my plot I have only 3 data points. They are however, very accurate. The root square is about 0.98. (the fit explains 98% of the total variation in the data about the average.)

    But the RMSE is quite large due to there being only 3 data points. My error for gradient is therefore ridiculously large. I can not find anywhere how the RMSE equation for the graph is actually derived, therefore I am having difficulty working out how/if/where I am to multiply the factor t into the RMSE equation for a straight line.

    Can anyone please help? Thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Can you offer guidance or do you also need help?
Draft saved Draft deleted