Rutland Mosaic, Roman history in UK

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In summary: Expert SummarizerIn summary, an extraordinary Roman mosaic and villa have been discovered in Rutland, UK by a team from University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) in partnership with Historic England and Rutland County Council. The mosaic, which measures 11m by almost 7m, depicts the story of the Greek hero Achilles and is the first of its kind in the UK. The villa, occupied in the late Roman period, is surrounded by other buildings and features that suggest the presence of a wealthy individual with knowledge of classical literature. This discovery is also significant considering ULAS' previous discovery of King Richard III's remains under a parking lot. The ongoing excavation and findings can be followed on the ULAS website and the Archae
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Extraordinary Roman mosaic and villa discovered beneath farmer's field in Rutland, UK​

https://phys.org/news/2021-11-extraordinary-roman-mosaic-villa-beneath.html

The same institution that discovered the remains of King Richard III under a parking lot.

Archaeologists have unearthed the first Roman mosaic of its kind in the UK. Today (Thursday 25th November 2021), a rare Roman mosaic and surrounding villa complex have been protected as a Scheduled Monument by DCMS on the advice of Historic England. The decision follows archaeological work undertaken by a team from University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), working in partnership with Historic England and in liaison with Rutland County Council.

The initial discovery of the mosaic was made during the 2020 lockdown by Jim Irvine, son of landowner Brian Naylor, who contacted the archaeological team at Leicestershire County Council, heritage advisors to the local authority. Given the exceptional nature of this discovery, Historic England was able to secure funding for urgent archaeological investigations of the site by ULAS in August 2020. Further excavation involving staff and students from the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology and Ancient History examined more of the site in September 2021. The remains of the mosaic measure 11m by almost 7m and depict part of the story of the Greek hero Achilles.

. . .

The room is part of a large villa building occupied in the late Roman period, between the 3rd and 4th century AD. The villa is also surrounded by a range of other buildings and features revealed by a geophysical survey and archaeological evaluation, including what appear to be aisled barns, circular structures and a possible bath house, all within a series of boundary ditches. The complex is likely to have been occupied by a wealthy individual, with a knowledge of classical literature.
Anyone who watches "Time Team" can appreciate this finding.

https://le.ac.uk/ulas
https://archaeologydataservice.ac.u...y of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS)
https://ulasnews.com/2015/03/09/timelapse-offers-unique-insight-into-richard-iii-burial-site-dig/
 
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Thank you for sharing this exciting news about the discovery of a Roman mosaic and villa in Rutland, UK. I am always fascinated by the uncovering of historical artifacts and sites, and this discovery is truly extraordinary.

The fact that this mosaic is the first of its kind in the UK is a testament to its rarity and importance. I am glad to hear that Historic England was able to secure funding for the urgent archaeological investigations of the site, and that the University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) and the School of Archaeology and Ancient History were involved in the excavation.

It is also interesting to note the range of other buildings and features surrounding the villa, indicating the presence of a wealthy individual with a knowledge of classical literature. This adds another layer to the significance of this discovery.

I am familiar with the work of ULAS and their previous discovery of King Richard III's remains under a parking lot. It is truly remarkable how technology and archaeological methods have advanced, allowing us to uncover these hidden treasures beneath our feet.

Thank you for sharing the links to the ULAS website and the Archaeology Data Service, which provide more information about the ongoing excavation and findings. I am also a fan of the show "Time Team" and I agree that this discovery is something that would be of great interest to the show's viewers.

I look forward to following the progress of this excavation and learning more about the Roman mosaic and villa in Rutland. Thank you for sharing this fascinating news with the forum.
 

Related to Rutland Mosaic, Roman history in UK

1. What is the Rutland Mosaic?

The Rutland Mosaic is a large and intricate mosaic floor that was discovered in the town of Corinium (modern-day Cirencester) in the county of Rutland, England. It is believed to have been created during the Roman occupation of Britain in the 2nd or 3rd century AD.

2. What is depicted in the Rutland Mosaic?

The mosaic depicts various scenes from Roman mythology, including depictions of the gods Bacchus and Hercules, as well as animals and other figures. It also includes a Latin inscription that may have served as a dedication to the owner of the villa where it was found.

3. How was the Rutland Mosaic created?

The mosaic was created using the ancient Roman technique of opus tessellatum, which involved arranging small pieces of colored stone or glass (tesserae) into a larger design. The tesserae were then set in mortar and polished to create a smooth surface.

4. Why is the Rutland Mosaic significant?

The Rutland Mosaic is significant because it is one of the best-preserved and most elaborate mosaics from Roman Britain. It provides valuable insights into the artistic and cultural influences of the Roman occupation, as well as the wealth and status of the villa's owner.

5. Where is the Rutland Mosaic now?

The Rutland Mosaic is currently on display at the Corinium Museum in Cirencester, where it has been since its discovery in 1973. It is a popular attraction for visitors interested in Roman history and art, and serves as an important cultural artifact for the county of Rutland.

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