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Calculus Self-learning calculus for physics

  1. Mar 18, 2015 #1
    Hello all,

    I am interested in physics and I know that a some amount of calculus is required for high school physics. We don't start calculus until the end of next year i.e end of 11th grade (I have just finished 9th grade), although the level of physics we do is quite high. Can someone recommend me books (preferable) or online videos/courses (things like coursera's calculus one) to learn the calculus required for high-school calculus based physics (probably the calculus required for textbooks like Halliday, Resnick, Walker) ? I don't want to get too deep into the subject as I'll probably do it when I actually study Calculus in school. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 18, 2015 #2

    CalcNerd

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    Look for a text book called Technical Math with Calculus. There are several. Buy one that you can also find a solutions book available and has good ratings.

    This type of math book tends to avoid heavy theory and would have the type of problems that you could probably handle, with lots of practical problems.

    These are great for self study to get you to where you want and when finished, you would be able to solve a fair amount of problems at any level. No, this is not a rigorous text that would provide deep mathematical rigor, but that won't be required until college calculus.
     
  4. Mar 19, 2015 #3
    Do you mean something like this ? - https://www.amazon.com/Technical-Mathematics-Calculus-Paul-Calter/dp/0470464720

    Another question is, do I need to finish the previous chapters to get to calculus? Or can I start directly from derivatives?
     
  5. Mar 19, 2015 #4

    CalcNerd

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    https://www.amazon.com/Basic-Techni...eywords=technical+mathematics+with+calculus+4

    Something like you found would be fine, but since you are not enrolled in any particular class, you could look at the older (cheaper) editions of these types of books. check the link I have. It is for a similar book but it is an older and much less expensive book that should provide you with a very similar experience.

    As for where to start, you certainly shouldn't start with chapter 1, unless you see material you are not comfortable with. But I would also suggest you pick up somewhere before derivatives just to get the feel of the problems. Think of this as a practical guide to solving math problems.
     
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