Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Sexual Intercourse Therapeutic?

  1. Jan 29, 2012 #1


    I found it interesting to say the least, but I would like to know what other people think about her way of helping people understand their bodies?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 29, 2012 #2

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    We don't assume people know how to drive a car without having any tutelage at it, yet for some reason we just assume everyone knows how to have intimate relations. Kind of a silly double standard really.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  4. Jan 29, 2012 #3
    Unfortunately, prostitution or similar sex practices are given a very bad name because of our Neanderthal traditions. So, I do see many legal/moral/political issues if sex were to be recognized as a therapy.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  5. Jan 29, 2012 #4

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I think "Sexual Guidance Counselor" is a more descriptive title than "Sex Therapist".

    And no, I don't think it's a bad idea. I can see a place for it. I've known people who grew up in incredibly repressive households, who would benefit from such "counselling".
     
  6. Jan 29, 2012 #5
    So would she still be called a 'shrink' or.....
     
  7. Jan 29, 2012 #6

    Char. Limit

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Seems like a good idea to me. I really don't see how people should just be expected to know all that stuff. Perhaps it'd be a lot more pleasurable for both sides if even just one of them was properly instructed.
     
  8. Jan 29, 2012 #7

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Haha, good one!

    CNN interviewed her and showed a bit from the movie.

    I think all so-called victimless crimes should be legal, so this one is easy, especially given that she's actually helping people. The older I get, the more I see laws in this regard as archaic and absurd.
     
  9. Jan 29, 2012 #8

    chiro

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    If the clients get something out of it, then why not.

    I really don't know why sex is such a taboo topic. The romans have been having orgies for god knows how long, and at least the indians have been interested in positions god knows how long too.

    I understand the issues about telling kids about contraception and potential diseases and other problems, but other than that the whole taboo that comes with sex IMO is completely unnecessary and might even be damaging.

    It's a natural thing (both males and females have the gear given to them naturally) and unfortunately many people treat it as something that is unnatural and controversial.
     
  10. Jan 30, 2012 #9

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I would bet that at the core, all laws in this regard are a residue of religion.
     
  11. Jan 30, 2012 #10

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Now what would people think if the shrink was a man?
     
  12. Jan 30, 2012 #11

    Char. Limit

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I don't know how other people would think, but I wouldn't see a problem with that any more than if the shrink was a woman. I mean, if we're going to have this kind of instruction for men, why not for women?
     
  13. Jan 30, 2012 #12

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Me either, but I predict it would be less socially acceptable in the population.
     
  14. Jan 30, 2012 #13
    Sometimes, there is a significant gap between an idea, when it is no more than that, and the human reality of its application. The dubiousness of a male sex counsellor proposing engagement in actual sexual contact with a woman who is experiencing difficulties with her own abilities to express her sexuality in a way that is genuinely fulfilling for her, and in no way damaging for her, is inescapable. And I don’t accept that there is anything remotely repressed in recognising that. It seems to me that there is abundant evidence that very few people, these days, believe that there is anything inherently ‘wrong’ in their natural, sexual feelings. What is ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ is how we treat each other, and the bald reality is that sex remains, as it has always been, a tool of exploitation and of the exercise of power and control.

    Exactly how that works in the reverse case, when the counsellor is female and the patient – would that be the right term? – is male, is different. What this woman’s motivations are I have no idea. I have not seen the film or read much about it to begin to form much opinion about it. Perhaps it might persuade me otherwise, but I doubt it. I cannot perceive of what a patient would gain from actual sexual contact with the counsellor that could not be gained with the maintenance of a professional distance between counsellor and counselled. These days, there is enough material, literature, film, discussion in the media, discussion in society at large, that it seems unlikely to me that many need much guidance in the physical act. If people want of education in this area, it seems to me that it is much more in the matter of how to live with a partner, long term, in a way that fosters the genuine intimacy required for fulfilling sexual expression. And I see no need for actual sexual contact between counsellor and counselled for that to be successfully taught.
     
  15. Jan 30, 2012 #14

    chiro

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    If both parties consent and are old enough and able enough (this is a subject of debate in itself) to understand what it means to give their consent, then why not.

    Legally kids can't purchase alcohol, cigarettes, or go to brothels unless they become legally able to by age.

    I can't see why this can't be used in this situation.
     
  16. Jan 30, 2012 #15
    Normally, patient/counselor relations are forbidden because in a lot of cases you can assume the patient not to have an 'adult' mind, so the 'two consenting adults' argument doesn't stick.

    I don't have the feeling there's a lot wrong in this situation, though.
     
  17. Feb 1, 2012 #16
    The articles about the movie and about Cheryl don't point out that Cheryl is not a "shrink" or a therapist, but that she WORKS WITH a therapist. All legitimate surrogate partners with in conjunction with a therapist who oversees the therapy and helps to design the treatment plan.
     
  18. Feb 1, 2012 #17

    Pythagorean

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    ah, thanks for pointing that out ICreateSafety.
     
  19. Feb 1, 2012 #18
    A surrogate partner (not sex counselor!) is willing to create a real-life situation for experiential learning by partnering with a client within the therapist-surrogate-client framework (see the website of the International Professional Surrogates Association www.surrogatetherapy.org) for more information.

    So if the surrogate partner is male, it's "dubious", but if the surrogate partner is female, it's "different." This illustrates a double standard. We seem to have the cultural stereotype that in matters of intimacy and sexuality that men are the takers and women are the givers. This idea is disempowering to both genders. It can pressure women to give when they don't want to and it can prevent male sexuality from being recognized as the gift that it can be and often is.

    As a professional male surrogate partner, I have experienced times when people question my motivations. They question whether a man can work with intimacy as an offering, with the genuine intention to help and support people be more accepting of themselves, their bodies, and their sexuality. Yet all surrogates know that this is not a job anyone would do to "have a good time."
     
  20. Feb 1, 2012 #19
    I don't think it's so much that she's helping people to understand their bodies, but rather helping people to accept who they are and being comfortable with it. Learning to relax and not be anxious about intimacy. She seems like a thoughtful person doing a worthwhile service for certain people. The therapist who was arguing with her was hot but seemed to have a bit of a bug up her posterior region, and perhaps a candidate for the very sort of therapy that she's criticizing.
     
  21. Feb 1, 2012 #20

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    How do you deal with emotional entanglement - either your client towards you, or you towards your client?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Sexual Intercourse Therapeutic?
  1. Sexual energy ? (Replies: 29)

  2. Sexual Freedom (Replies: 21)

Loading...