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Shape of electric lines of force created by an oscillating charge?

  1. May 25, 2010 #1
    can someone please help me fast? i am having trouble understanding http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/waves_particles/wpwaves5.html" [Broken]?
    here it is said that farther away from the vibrating charge the shape of the wave on the line of electric force changes? but is not the shape supposed to be same throughout the wave? please help fast? got exams soon?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2010 #2

    Jano L.

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  4. May 26, 2010 #3
    thank you very very much for your quick help Jano L. thanks a lot!
    is it something like, the movement of another charge in the field remains constant, but the line of force between the charges change?
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2010
  5. May 26, 2010 #4

    Jano L.

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    I'm afraid I do not understand your question. But on the picture I sent you, you can see the electric field lines of oscillating point charge. Notice they are curved strongly and this curvature propagates (in fact with the velocity of light) out. If the charge were moving with constant velocity, the field lines would be only squeezed in the direction of motion (Lorentz contraction), but they would be straight.
     
  6. May 26, 2010 #5
    thanks very much for your help though, Jano L.. it will take some time to understand the whole thing.
     
  7. Sep 12, 2010 #6
    can you be a little more detailed Jano L. and simpler. Because I kind of still did not get it. What is the Lorentz contraction?
     
  8. Sep 12, 2010 #7

    Jano L.

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    I'm afraid I can't tell you the whole story from Adam. You would have to refer to some textbook, like Feynman's lectures on physics or others. Good luck!
     
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