Size of links and loads in the hydraulic system

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  • #1
roman9912
I am currently in the process of creating my own design in which every millimeter counts. I have the following question: does the cross-section area of the highlighted link make a difference, and does decreasing the area makes force exerted on the walls greater?

My guess is that cross-section area makes no difference and I know nothing of the second one.

College physics textbook seem to have no answer for either question. Any help from someone who know it?
 

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  • #2
Nidum
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That 'link' is actually a tube which passes the working fluid from one cylinder to the other ?

Cross sectional area could affect the rate at which fluid is transferred and so control the rate at which the pistons can move . A quite simple calculation is possible but you will have to tell us more about the speeds that you want your pistons to be able to move at .

The forces acting on the tube and any resulting stresses depend on how the actual mechanical parts are arranged . Again quite simple calculations are possible but you will have to tell us more about the details of the assembly . Most significant thing we need to know is whether the cylinders are fixed in place or not .
 
  • #3
roman9912
View attachment 211404

That 'link' is actually a tube which passes the working fluid from one cylinder to the other ?

Cross sectional area could affect the rate at which fluid is transferred and so control the rate at which the pistons can move . A quite simple calculation is possible but you will have to tell us more about the speeds that you want your pistons to be able to move at .

The forces acting on the tube and any resulting stresses depend on how the actual mechanical parts are arranged . Again quite simple calculations are possible but you will have to tell us more about the details of the assembly . Most significant thing we need to know is whether the cylinders are fixed in place or not .

Yes the link is precisely that. What im trying to do is to transfer motion from one axis to the spring on the other (due to size constraints). I can give it a try and do 3D model + fluid simulation, but I would want to know for sure of the design constraints. All the links and fluid paths will be inside a molded part.

Thanks for your input
 
  • #4
Nidum
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A small number of back of envelope calculations will tell you all you need to know . Doing full CFD analysis is a bit excessive for this problem !
 

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