Solar imaging and techniques

  • #176
davenn
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Current stretch spotless days: 13

if that came from spaceweather.com ... they are not overly accurate. I have already sent them emails in days gone by
stating how blind they are in not seeing spots and saying it was a spotless day when in fact there were obvious spots :rolleyes::rolleyes:

This happens quite regularly

Dave
 
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  • #177
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if that came from spaceweather.com ... they are not overly accurate. I have already sent them emails in days gone by
stating how blind they are in not seeing spots and saying it was a spotless day when in fact there were obvious spots :rolleyes::rolleyes:

This happens quite regularly

Dave
I've been suspecting that myself, on occasion. What is the exact meaning of "stretch" in the quote?
 
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  • #178
davenn
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What is the exact meaning of "stretch" in the quote?
one would assume that they are referring to 12 actual days in a row without spots
it would appear to be their definition

ohhh, note they are saying 12 days ... maybe you typo'ed with the 13 ?
 
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  • #179
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ohhh, note they are saying 12 days ... maybe you typo'ed with the 13 ?
I read 13 yesterday morning (July 9), on my location. It's probably the time difference of our updates or their inaccuracy (since the spot group had already appeared!).
But I used as source spaceweatherlive.com (https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions), not spaceweather.com (which is probably better [i.e. the latter], as you had pointed out to me in the past). I use both at times.
 
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  • #180
davenn
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I read 13 yesterday morning (July 9), on my location. It's probably the time difference of our updates or their inaccuracy (since the spot group had already appeared!).
hahaha but I am ahead of you in time unless you are in New Zealand or up in Fiji, Cook Islands etc LOL :-p


But I used as source spaceweatherlive.com (https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions),
ahhh yeah
As you stated, I use the main site that also has all the other info

http://www.spaceweather.com/

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 12 days
2018 total: 99 days (52%)


cheers
Dave
 
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  • #181
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  • #182
davenn
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Current stretch spotless days: 14"
that doesn't seem right

I would have to check my solar records when I get home

I'm surprised the two sites do not agree! ...
and yeah totally stupid that their own 2 sites cannot agree ..... another reason that they are not to be relied on :frown: :rolleyes::rolleyes:
 
  • #183
davenn
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09 Sept. 2018
The Sun in Ha

Hi guys,
first solar observing for a month. Winter time isnt conducive for having the sun in the sky outside of work hours. Some nice prominences to be had this weekend
Lunt 60mm Ha solar scope, 12mm BF, Televue x2.5 Powermate, ASI1600mm Cam and Sharpcap

180909 Ha Cap_02.jpg



180909 Ha Cap_14.jpg


180909 Ha Cap_18.jpg


180909 Ha Cap_21.jpg



cheers
Dave
 

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  • #184
davenn
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The Sun in Ha 30/09/2018
Nice hedgerow prominence and a small spot group
Lunt LS60 THa and ASI 1600MM
The first 2 images just scope and camera last 2 images with Televue x2.5 Powermate

180930 Cap 003.jpg


180930 Cap 017.jpg


180930 Cap 045.jpg


180930 Cap 053.jpg




Dave
 

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  • #185
davenn
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After months of no solar images from me ( for various reasons) I finally managed to get some today (Sat 13th Apr)
These are just single shot images ( no stacking) with my Lunt LS60THa ... the close up image is with the Televue x2.5 Powermate inline. Camera is the ZWO ASI1600MM

190413 Cap002-2.jpg


190413 Cap004-2.jpg


190413 Cap005-2.jpg


190413 Cap015.jpg
 
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  • #186
sophiecentaur
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Fab detail!
 
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  • #187
davenn
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Fab detail!

Thankyou :smile:

You may have noticed that curved banding in the closeup image ( also on an earlier post)
These are Newtons Rings caused by slight misalignment along the optical path somewhere
It isn't noticeable on the usual images, but as soon ad the 2.5 multiplier is in line, they become very obvious.

I have a tilt adaptor on order, hope to see it in a week or 2

https://www.bintel.com.au/product/zwo-t2-tilt-adjuster/?v=6cc98ba2045f
T2-Tilter-camera3-510x510.jpg


The above shows the tilt adjuster with the imaging camera mounted behind it

Interestingly, the NR's can be removed using FFT processing of the image. A fellow solar photographer took that image of mine and processed it in Photoshop with a FFT plug-in

Before.....
PJJNDTt9PtMNnMQum3tRh9jby3g&_nc_ht=scontent-syd2-1.jpg



After ......
cJYxV9yk0Wlu4SV1USRdBmZQR6w&_nc_ht=scontent-syd2-1.jpg


DANG .... what a difference !

I have tried and tried to do this with the PS plugin that he uses, and I just cannot figure out how he does it


Dave
 
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  • #188
sophiecentaur
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Those Newton's rings, although they are a bit of a pest, show that the optics is pretty good - because they are very even. Your corrector would well take care of them. So could a bit of tinkering with photoshop, if you can produce a flat or even generate your own Newton pattern.
Whoops - I just read what you wrote about FFT / spatial filtering.
 
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  • #189
davenn
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The Sun today - 07 May 2019 0130UT (1130 AEST) ( Australian Eastern Standard Time)
Lunt LS60THa single frame exposures with an ASI 1600MM Camera
AR2740 and with AR2741 just coming around the limb
(AR = Active Region)

Capture_00004sm.jpg


Capture_00009sm.jpg


Capture_00016sm.jpg


Capture_00020sm.jpg



Well the Tilt Adjuster works and got rid of the Newtons Rings in the higher magnification images:smile:

https://www.bintel.com.au/product/zwo-t2-tilt-adjuster/?v=6cc98ba2045f
if you follow the link you can see that there are sets of screws that can be adjusted. The adjustment of these removes alignment errors between the optics and the imaging sensor that cause the Newtons Rings that can be seen in images I have previously posted.


Dave
 
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  • #190
davenn
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The Sun, 14 May 2019
One significant active region AR2741
One reasonable prominence on the limb
LUNT LS60THa Solar scope, ASI 1600MM and ZWO Tilt Adjuster

190514 Cap 012sm.jpg



190514 Cap 015sm.jpg





Dave
 
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  • #191
sophiecentaur
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I was looking through a friends Coronado (?) which is an entry level solar scope with a dim red display (the filter). We could see flares and the amazing thing was that they were visibly changing over a morning. What speed that stuff must be moving for the changes to be that visible.
 
  • #192
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We could see flares and the amazing thing was that they were visibly changing over a morning. What speed that stuff must be moving for the changes to be that visible.
Not surprising. Impulsive solar flares can even last for only a few minutes (and one is lucky to see them ...). What you observed was flares or prominences?
 
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  • #193
sophiecentaur
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Not surprising. Impulsive solar flares can even last for only a few minutes (and one is lucky to see them ...). What you observed was flares or prominences?
Ah well - I was told they were flares.
 
  • #194
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Ah well - I was told they were flares.
They could have been. Solar flares can even be long duration events, even lasting up to an hour or more ...
When exactly was that? (we may check with solar records /+ Dave may know more ...)
 
  • #195
sophiecentaur
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WE saw whatever it was around midday BST on 5th May. Then the danged clouds came over.
 
  • #196
davenn
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Ah well - I was told they were flares.
were they bright areas on the face of the sun near the active region ?
If so then quite possibly they were flares

or

were they the features on the limb of the sun like you see in my above fotos ?
If yes, then they are prominences, not flares .... many don't realise they are not flares
including possibly your friend


Dave
 
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  • #198
davenn
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Based on approximate time ... yep, it could have been flare
depending on where on the sun it was :)

still awaiting @sophiecentaur 's reply to my questions :)
 
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  • #199
sophiecentaur
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depending on where on the sun it was :)

still awaiting @sophiecentaur 's reply to my questions :)
What I was looking at was on the edge ('limb"?) and was perhaps a few percent of the diameter of the disc. Whether that was what my companions were referring to is anyone's guess; they may have spotted flares too. But I thought the prominences (?) did change in size. I was surprised at the apparent speed if you translate it to many thousands of km/hr. I mean, when you think of the time that stuff ejected by the Sun takes to get here then it doesn't seem to scale with the apparent distances / heights of the features I was seeing. I have obviously got something wrong in my intuition about this.
Edit:
Perhaps those flares do not actually involve matter travelling as fast but, instead, appear and disappear like clouds in our atmosphere. So the speeds wouldn't;t need to be as high.
BTW Once again - lovely images @davenn .
 
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  • #200
davenn
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I was looking through a friends Coronado (?) which is an entry level solar scope with a dim red display (the filter

Ohhh I had meant to comment on this. They are actually a very respectable Ha solar scope
have a friend on a Facebook solar page that does wonderful imaging with a Coronado PST
and a ZWO ASI120MM cam .....

424687616_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_ht=scontent-sea1-1.jpg


Juan Payá from SE Spain
He's an expert at capturing movie clips stacking their frames and doing outstanding editing as above
That was just a couple of days ago

Dave
 
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