Solving for the Speed of a Toy Cannon's Projectile

In summary, a 5.30 g soft rubber ball is projected from a toy cannon using a spring that is compressed by 5.00 cm and has a force constant of 8.00 N/m. The ball moves 15.0 cm through the horizontal barrel of the cannon and experiences a friction force of 0.032 N. Using the equations for kinetic and potential energy, as well as the conservation of total energy, the speed of the projectile leaving the barrel can be determined.
  • #1
jq.barista
1
0
A toy cannon uses a spring to project a 5.30 g soft rubber ball. The spring is originally compressed by 5.00 cm and has a force constant of 8.00 N/m. When the cannon is fired, the ball moves 15.0 cm through the horizontal barrel of the cannon and barrel exerts a constant friction force of 0.032 N on the ball. a) With what speed does the projectile leave the barrel of the cannon?
I thought to use the equation 1/2mv + 1/2kx = 1/2mv + 1/2kx
But having the friction with the barrel, I got lost, and have no idea where to go from there. Or actually where to start.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


jq.barista said:
A toy cannon uses a spring to project a 5.30 g soft rubber ball. The spring is originally compressed by 5.00 cm and has a force constant of 8.00 N/m. When the cannon is fired, the ball moves 15.0 cm through the horizontal barrel of the cannon and barrel exerts a constant friction force of 0.032 N on the ball. a) With what speed does the projectile leave the barrel of the cannon?



I thought to use the equation 1/2mv + 1/2kx = 1/2mv + 1/2kx
But having the friction with the barrel, I got lost, and have no idea where to go from there. Or actually where to start.
Please note that KE is 1/2 mv^2 and PE_spring = 1/2 kx^2. Also you should be familiar with the conservation of total energy equation when non-conservative forces are involved, you know, W_nc = delta KE + delta PE?
Welcome to PF! Please now give it a try.
 

Related to Solving for the Speed of a Toy Cannon's Projectile

What is the speed of a toy cannon's projectile?

The speed of a toy cannon's projectile can vary depending on a variety of factors such as the type of toy cannon, the angle at which it is fired, and the amount of force used to launch it. It is important to accurately measure the speed in order to understand and predict the trajectory of the projectile.

How do you calculate the speed of a toy cannon's projectile?

The speed of a toy cannon's projectile can be calculated using the formula v = √(2gh), where v is the speed, g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2), and h is the height of the toy cannon from which the projectile is launched. This formula assumes no air resistance and a perfectly horizontal trajectory.

What are the different methods for measuring the speed of a toy cannon's projectile?

There are several methods for measuring the speed of a toy cannon's projectile, including using a stopwatch to time the projectile's flight and measuring the distance traveled by the projectile. Other methods include using a high-speed camera to capture the projectile's motion and using sensors to measure the acceleration of the projectile.

Why is it important to calculate the speed of a toy cannon's projectile?

Calculating the speed of a toy cannon's projectile is important for understanding and predicting its trajectory. This information can be useful for safety purposes, as well as for optimizing the design and performance of the toy cannon. It can also help in determining the maximum range of the projectile and its impact force.

What are some limitations to accurately measuring the speed of a toy cannon's projectile?

There are several limitations to accurately measuring the speed of a toy cannon's projectile. These include factors such as air resistance, which can significantly affect the projectile's speed, as well as human error in timing or measuring the distance traveled. Additionally, different methods of measurement may also have their own limitations and sources of error.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
912
Replies
3
Views
999
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
900
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
966
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
5K
Back
Top