Specific heats relating to ideal gas properties?

In summary, in a rigid well-insulated container, a partition separates two gases with different properties. The air has a mass of 1kg, pressure of 500kPa, and temperature of 350K, while CO_2 has a mass of 3kg, pressure of 200kPa, and temperature of 450K. The specific heats are assumed to be constant and both gases behave as ideal gases. The partition can transfer heat between the gases but cannot hold any energy itself. To find the specific heats of air and CO_2, consult a table in the book.
  • #1
dillonmhudson
49
0
Partition separates two gases in a rigid well-insulated container. Q=0, W=0.

State 1:

Air:
m=1kg
P=500kPa
T=350K

CO_2:
m=3kg
P=200kPa
T=450K

Assume constant specific heats. Assume kinetic and potential energy changes are negligible. Assume the partition between the two gases can transfer heat between each other and the partition cannot hold any energy itself. Assume both behave as ideal gases.

My question is what equation/table do I use to find out what the specific heats of air and CO_2 actually are?

I appreciate any help.

EDIT: Find the final temp using the first law:
Q-W=m(u2-u1)
Q=0
W=0
U2-U1=0
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Nevermind. There's a table in my book I can use.
 

Related to Specific heats relating to ideal gas properties?

1. What is specific heat and how is it related to ideal gas properties?

Specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one unit mass of a substance by one degree. In ideal gases, the specific heat is directly proportional to the number of molecules present and the temperature of the gas.

2. How is the specific heat of an ideal gas determined?

The specific heat of an ideal gas can be determined experimentally by measuring the change in temperature of the gas when a known amount of heat is added or removed. It can also be calculated using the ideal gas law and the molar specific heat of the gas.

3. What is the relationship between specific heat and the internal energy of an ideal gas?

The internal energy of an ideal gas is directly related to its specific heat. The specific heat at constant volume is equal to the change in internal energy divided by the change in temperature. The specific heat at constant pressure is equal to the change in enthalpy divided by the change in temperature.

4. How does specific heat affect the behavior of an ideal gas?

The specific heat of an ideal gas affects its ability to absorb or release heat. A gas with a high specific heat will require more heat to raise its temperature compared to a gas with a lower specific heat. This can also affect the gas's thermal expansion and compressibility.

5. What factors can influence the specific heat of an ideal gas?

The specific heat of an ideal gas can be influenced by factors such as temperature, pressure, and the type of gas molecules present. It can also depend on the conditions of the experiment, such as if the gas is kept at constant volume or constant pressure.

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