Specific heat at constt. volume of an ideal gas

In summary, specific heat at constant volume is a measure of the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a substance while keeping its volume constant. It can be calculated using the formula Cv = (3/2)R for monoatomic gases and (5/2)R for diatomic gases. It varies with temperature and plays a crucial role in the behavior of gases, affecting their ability to expand or contract, speed of sound, and adiabatic index.
  • #1
Apashanka
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IMG_20181115_120422.jpg

The ans comes out (c) if I take specific heat at constt volume to be independent of temp.
Whether the specific heat is always temp. independent for an ideal gas??
 

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  • #2
Physicists define an ideal gas as a substance with a specific heat that is independent of temperature. Engineers define an ideal gas as the limiting behavior of a real gas at low density, such that its specific heat is dependent on temperature. Other disciplines, I don't know.
 

Related to Specific heat at constt. volume of an ideal gas

1. What is specific heat at constant volume?

Specific heat at constant volume is a measure of the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of a substance by one degree while keeping its volume constant. It is denoted by the symbol Cv and is expressed in units of energy per unit mass per degree (J/kg·K).

2. What is the difference between constant volume and constant pressure specific heat?

The main difference between constant volume and constant pressure specific heat is that constant volume specific heat (Cv) measures the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a substance while keeping its volume constant, whereas constant pressure specific heat (Cp) measures the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a substance while allowing it to expand or contract.

3. How is specific heat at constant volume of an ideal gas calculated?

The specific heat at constant volume of an ideal gas can be calculated using the formula Cv = (3/2)R, where R is the gas constant. This formula applies to monoatomic gases, such as helium and argon. For diatomic gases, such as oxygen and nitrogen, the value of Cv is (5/2)R.

4. Does specific heat at constant volume vary with temperature?

Yes, specific heat at constant volume can vary with temperature. As the temperature increases, the internal energy of the gas also increases, meaning that more heat is required to raise the temperature by one degree. This results in a higher Cv value at higher temperatures.

5. How does specific heat at constant volume affect the behavior of gases?

Specific heat at constant volume plays a crucial role in the behavior of gases. It determines the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a gas, which in turn affects its ability to expand or contract. It also influences the speed of sound and the adiabatic index of a gas, which are important factors in the study of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics.

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