Spring Stretch in Circular Motion

In summary, the given problem involves a small ball attached to one end of a spring that is being whirled around in a horizontal circle. The spring stretches by 0.010 m and the problem asks how much it would stretch if attached to the ceiling and the ball is allowed to hang motionless. Using the equation F=kx, the solution is x=0.010m. However, there may be a discrepancy in the solution and further explanation or reasoning is needed to determine the correct answer.
  • #1
robax25
238
3

Homework Statement



A small ball is attached to one end of a spring that has an unstrained length of 0.200 m. The spring is held by the other end, and the ball is whirled around in a horizontal circle at a speed of 3.00 m/s. The spring remains nearly parallel to the ground during the motion and is observed to stretch by 0.010 m. By how much would the spring stretch if it were attached to the ceiling and the ball allowed to hang straight down, motionless?

Homework Equations



F=kx

The Attempt at a Solution


x=0.010m.
 
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  • #2
robax25 said:

Homework Statement



A small ball is attached to one end of a spring that has an unstrained length of 0.200 m. The spring is held by the other end, and the ball is whirled around in a horizontal circle at a speed of 3.00 m/s. The spring remains nearly parallel to the ground during the motion and is observed to stretch by 0.010 m. By how much would the spring stretch if it were attached to the ceiling and the ball allowed to hang straight down, motionless?

Homework Equations



F=kx

The Attempt at a Solution


x=0.010m.
That's not what I get. If you show your reasoning, maybe we can figure out why we differ.
 

Related to Spring Stretch in Circular Motion

1. What is the "spring stretch problem"?

The "spring stretch problem" is a physics problem that involves determining the displacement of a spring when a known force is applied to it. It is used to understand the behavior and properties of springs, which are commonly used in various mechanical systems.

2. How do you calculate the displacement of a spring in the "spring stretch problem"?

The displacement of a spring can be calculated using Hooke's Law, which states that the force applied to the spring is directly proportional to the amount of stretch or compression of the spring. The formula for displacement is given by x = F/k, where x is the displacement, F is the applied force, and k is the spring constant.

3. What factors affect the displacement of a spring in the "spring stretch problem"?

The displacement of a spring is affected by several factors, including the applied force, the length and thickness of the spring, and the material properties of the spring. The spring constant, which is a measure of the stiffness of the spring, also plays a significant role in determining the displacement.

4. What is the difference between a linear and non-linear spring in the "spring stretch problem"?

A linear spring follows Hooke's Law and has a constant spring constant, meaning that the displacement is directly proportional to the applied force. On the other hand, a non-linear spring does not follow Hooke's Law and may have varying spring constants at different points of displacement, resulting in a non-linear relationship between force and displacement.

5. How is the "spring stretch problem" used in real-world applications?

The "spring stretch problem" is used in various real-world applications, such as designing and testing springs for use in mechanical systems, determining the maximum load a spring can withstand before breaking, and understanding the behavior of springs in different environments and conditions. It is also used in industries such as automotive, aerospace, and construction to ensure the proper functioning of springs in their respective applications.

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