Structural Questions about Memory B cells

In summary, the conversation discusses doubts about B cells and their differentiation into plasma and memory cells upon stimulation by a T-cell. The individual is interested in the structural differences between naive B cells, activated B cells, plasma B cells, and memory B cells, particularly in regards to detecting and measuring them for a specific antigen. It is suggested to refer to Roitt's Essential Immunology and Janeway's Immunobiology for more information, and to explore free online courses for a deeper understanding.
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TL;DR Summary
Is there a structural difference between mature B cells and memory B cells?
I have the following doubts regarding B cells.

Normally upon the stimulation by a T-cell, the activated B-cell differentiates into plasma and memory cells.

1) What are the structural differences among the naive B-cells, activated B-cells, Plasma B-cells, and memory B-cells? I am interested in the comparison of structures of Plasma B-cells and memory B-cells.
2) Is it possible to detect and measure all four?
a) Again I am particularly interested in the Plasma B-cells and memory B-cells for a particular antigen. How do we differentiate between them and can we detect and measure them?

Thanks in advance,
 
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This would require about 40 pages on the forum.

https://www.academia.edu/40521511/Janeways_Immunobiology_9th_Edition
Janeway Immunobiology 9th ed is in the public domain. Please download the and start reading with the caveat that more details about some more aspects of antibody creation are now known.

If there is acopy of the current 10th edition in a local school library, try that.

Actually the best thing you could do (if you have enough background) is to take a look at courses offered free over the internet. Start with into Virology, then go from there.

What you need is not feasible for PF. And a marginal overview will confuse you unduly.

That's all for now.
 

1. What are memory B cells and how do they differ from naive B cells?

Memory B cells are a type of white blood cell that are responsible for remembering previous infections and producing a rapid and robust response upon re-exposure to the same pathogen. They differ from naive B cells in that they have already been activated and undergone differentiation, making them more efficient at recognizing and responding to specific antigens.

2. How are memory B cells formed?

Memory B cells are formed through the process of somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. When a naive B cell is activated by an antigen, it undergoes multiple rounds of division and mutation, resulting in a diverse population of B cells with varying affinities for the antigen. The B cells with the highest affinity will survive and differentiate into memory B cells.

3. How long do memory B cells last in the body?

The lifespan of memory B cells can vary, but on average they can persist in the body for several years. Some studies have shown that memory B cells can last for decades, providing long-term protection against specific pathogens.

4. Can memory B cells be activated without the presence of a pathogen?

Yes, memory B cells can be activated without the presence of a pathogen through the process of cross-reactivity. This occurs when a memory B cell encounters a similar antigen to the one it was originally activated by, leading to a rapid and efficient response without the need for a full activation process.

5. How do memory B cells contribute to immunological memory?

Memory B cells play a crucial role in immunological memory by providing a quick and effective response to previously encountered pathogens. This allows for a faster and more efficient immune response, preventing the individual from becoming sick or reducing the severity of the illness.

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