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Taking PDE or abstract algebra

  1. Nov 12, 2006 #1

    quasar987

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    In my uni I am forced to make a painful choice btw taking PDE or abstract algebra. I will take algebra, but I'd like to know what I will be missing?

    What is being taught in this class exactly? (BESIDES HOW TO SOLVE A PDE BY SEPARATION OF VARIABLES :rolleyes:)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 12, 2006 #2
    what is pde
     
  4. Nov 12, 2006 #3

    jamesrc

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    I think it depends on what your academic/career goals are. In a Partial Differential Equations class, you'll probably cover Laplace Transforms and Fourier Series in addition to separation of variables. At least that's what I remember from that class.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2006 #4

    verty

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    Isn't abstract algebra something you could self-study?
     
  6. Nov 12, 2006 #5

    FredGarvin

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    I think Jamesrc is right. We covered both Laplace and Fourier and separation of variables. We concentrated on a lot of applications in my PDE class (wave equation, heat equation, membrane vibrations etc...).
     
  7. Nov 12, 2006 #6

    quasar987

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    Course sybalus reads,

    "Equation of the first order and secod order, caracteristic and classification, elliptic equations : laplace & poisson. wave equation, heat equation. Introduction to distributions and Green functions."

    How important are Green functions and distributions and what is an elliptic equation?

    Overall this looks like easily self-studiable stuff (contrary to the dense and fundamental group theory! I tried to self-study it last summer bu it was rough without the guidance of a prof.)


    P.S. PDE=Partial Differential Equations
     
  8. Nov 18, 2006 #7

    Dr Transport

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    A course in PDE's is more important to the education of a physicist than a course in abstract algebra. Almost every equation you solve as a physicist can be solved using those techniques. Unless you are going to be a mathematical physicist, you shouldn't need abstract algebra.
     
  9. Nov 18, 2006 #8
    You had to take PDE at LTU? It is not required anymore.
     
  10. Nov 18, 2006 #9
    Fourier analysis is usually a big part of a PDE course. I'm suprised a PDE course isn't required for the Physics degree, or at least strongly recommended.
     
  11. Nov 18, 2006 #10
    god that's all it takes to get a physics near you? i am required to take both those courses, plus another course dealing with method of characterisics and more advanced DE's... ugh
     
  12. Nov 18, 2006 #11

    quasar987

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    We we have a course called "Applied analysis" instead, where we see Fourier series, Fourier integrals, Sturm-Liouville theory and special functions at the level of a real analysis class.
     
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