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The G-factor?

  1. Dec 6, 2012 #1
    Hello, I'm having a hard time grasping this g-factor. Why was it invented? How do you solve for it?

    I'm currently using Serway's Modern Physics textbook right now, and I feel like it skimped on it so much that I just have no idea what it really is. If someone can expound, it would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2012 #2

    tom.stoer

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    The g-factor follows from a relativistic effect which can be derived naturally from the Dirac equation
     
  4. Dec 7, 2012 #3

    dextercioby

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    IIRC, g=2 for electron can be derived from Galilean-invariant quantum dynamics. The work by J.M. Lévy-Leblond supports this claim.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2012
  5. Dec 7, 2012 #4
    are you talking about lande factor? Yes,it can be derived naturally from Dirac eqn for electron.Also g is not exactly 2 because of radiative corrections.(vertex correction)
     
  6. Dec 8, 2012 #5

    Meir Achuz

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    There is a simple formula relating the magnetic moment to the angular momentum J
    in many simple cases:
    [tex]\mu=(e/2mc)J[/tex].
    When this relation is different a dimensionless factor g is introduced as
    [tex]\mu=g(e/2mc)J[/tex].
    For the electron the g factor is ver close to g=2.
     
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