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Thevenin voltage value

  1. Jan 3, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Zrzut ekranu 2016-01-04 o 01.42.53.png

    I calculated theoretical value of resistance - I assumed that R4 and R5 are in series and parallel to R2 and R3 which are in series, because I've considered B as the starting point - this is the method I was taught, but I don't know any method of calculating the voltage with the diode. Experimental value of voltage was about 3.75 V.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 3, 2016 #2

    gneill

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    There's not enough data to arrive at a numerical result. Were you not given component values?
     
  4. Jan 4, 2016 #3

    NascentOxygen

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    What are the resistance ratios you were given?
     
  5. Jan 4, 2016 #4
    Oh, I am sorry, I thought it was on the diagram:

    R2 = 5.6 kΩ, R3 = 2.7 kΩ, R4 = 6.8 kΩ, R5 = 3.3 kΩ

    R1 is apparently not necessary.
     
  6. Jan 4, 2016 #5

    NascentOxygen

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    Suppose R3 and R4 (and, for good measure, point B) were all erased from the drawing, could you calculate the voltage VA with respect to the lower end of the zener?
     
  7. Jan 4, 2016 #6

    cnh1995

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    If I understand the problem correctly, it is asked to find VAB i.e. the Thevenin voltage. Assuming the zener diode is in reverse breakdown region, voltage across it will be 6.2V, fixed. I believe the OP has assumed correct series-parallel combinations. But the voltage value I am getting is not 3.75V, which is obtained experimentally as said. Is there something wrong with the experimental value?
     
  8. Jan 4, 2016 #7
    I've also measured the current and calculated experimental resistance and it was 4.64 Ohms, so very close to theoretical value of 4.60 Ohm. Hence, I think it was pretty accurate experiment.
     
  9. Jan 4, 2016 #8

    cnh1995

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    Was the zener diode in breakdown region? I mean was the voltage across it 6.2V? If yes, I think VAB should be 2.14V.
     
  10. Jan 4, 2016 #9
    The voltage applied was 12V.

    Edit: I'm sorry. I measured the current and voltage for three applied voltages: 12, 15 and 18 V, but I need the value for 12V. I need to measure maximum theoretical power transfer.
     
  11. Jan 4, 2016 #10

    cnh1995

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    Still if the zener voltage is maintained at 6.2V, VAB will be same regardless of the supply voltage. Only the value of R1 will change.
     
  12. Jan 4, 2016 #11
    Or maybe there is no enough information and I need to use the experimental value of voltage. After all what I need is to compare maximum theoretical power transfer and maximum experimental power transfer. Maybe I can only compare it by using theoretical value of resistance for one and experimental value of resistance for another while the voltage value would be experimental in both cases.

    Edit: I read the problem again and it says specifically I need to use BOTH THEORETICAL values...
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2016
  13. Jan 4, 2016 #12
    What if I ignored R3 and R4 part of the circuit and I would be left with:
    Untitled.png
    Then I ignore R1 and 15 V source part and I would be just left with 6.2 "source" let's say and two resistors circuit. Then, using voltage dividor rule and the values of resistances of the resistors (5.6/(5.6+3.3))*6.2. That would give 3.9V at point A which is close enough to experimental value, but I just made this method up so I think it's bullshit.
     
  14. Jan 4, 2016 #13

    gneill

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    Can you share the actual problem statement with us?
     
  15. Jan 4, 2016 #14
    It's actually a lab report, so it's a whole document, but it's only one part of it - maximum power transfer.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Jan 4, 2016 #15

    gneill

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    The lab asks that you identify the values for resistors R2 and R4. What was involved in doing that?
     
  17. Jan 4, 2016 #16
    Reading from the colour codes. That was checked - they are correct.
     
  18. Jan 4, 2016 #17

    gneill

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    Did you also confirm that the other resistors (R3 and R5) actually had the values shown in the lab diagram?

    I'm trying to understand how you could have measured 3.75 V across AB given this circuit arrangement. If the zener really is a 6.2 V one, then I'm not seeing a way to achieve this with the given component values.
     
  19. Jan 4, 2016 #18
    Yes, I have. The resistances must be correct because theoretical and experimental values of resistances are almost identical.
     
  20. Jan 4, 2016 #19
    2015-11-12 09.27.53.jpg
    I found the photo of the circuit.
     

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  21. Jan 4, 2016 #20

    gneill

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    Looking at the photo, I question whether the color code for R4 is Blue-Violet-Red (6.8 k) or Blue-Violet-Orange (68 k). If it's the latter it might explain your measured voltage. It would push it to around 3.8 V.

    What short circuit current did you measure?
     
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