1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Thrust of an underpressure tank of air

  1. Jan 3, 2016 #1
    How can I calculate the thrust of an underpressure tank of air when the valve is released? If you can, please, explain in detail. Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 3, 2016 #2

    Bystander

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    "Underpressure?" Less than ambient?
     
  4. Jan 3, 2016 #3
    More than the ambient pressure
     
  5. Jan 3, 2016 #4

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Pressure "under" what? Do you mean when it's running out?
     
  6. Jan 3, 2016 #5

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    The OP just means the thrust produced by air escaping from a cylinder of compressed air.

    Most people in my country understand "under" to mean "due to". As in "The bridge failed under the weight of traffic".
     
  7. Jan 3, 2016 #6

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

  8. Jan 4, 2016 #7

    sophiecentaur

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I can see that now. In English, underpressure and "underweight" (compound words) have different meanings from when the two words are separated by a space; hence my confusion. If this were a German forum, things might be different. . . :smile:
     
  9. Jan 4, 2016 #8
    Can the mass flow rate and the velocity of the exhausted gas be calculated or those can only be measured in an experiment ?
     
  10. Jan 4, 2016 #9
    Bernoulli should be a good approximation.

    Not really. "Unterdruck" instead of "unter Druck" would result in the same confusion.
     
  11. Jan 4, 2016 #10
    Would it not just be the pressure in the tank x the area of the orifice?
    I.E. If the pressure is 1 Mpa (above ambient) and the orifice is 12mm then the thrust should be 1 newton, right?
     
  12. Jan 4, 2016 #11
    Your force is the normal force, and your pressure is the surface pressure. We can't use those in my problem. The thrust is based on other variables . Check out this link to find out more : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrust
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Thrust of an underpressure tank of air
  1. Illuminative Thrust (Replies: 1)

  2. What is thrust? (Replies: 7)

Loading...