Thrust of an underpressure tank of air

In summary, the conversation discussed calculating the thrust of an underpressure tank of air when the valve is released. The topic of "underpressure" caused some confusion, as it can have different meanings in different languages. It was clarified that the OP was referring to the thrust produced by air escaping from a compressed air cylinder. The conversation also touched on the possibility of calculating the mass flow rate and velocity of the exhausted gas, with Bernoulli's equation suggested as a good approximation. Ultimately, the thrust is based on other variables and cannot be determined solely by the pressure and area of the orifice.
  • #1
Raresss
4
0
How can I calculate the thrust of an underpressure tank of air when the valve is released? If you can, please, explain in detail. Thank you!
 
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  • #2
"Underpressure?" Less than ambient?
 
  • #3
Bystander said:
"Underpressure?" Less than ambient?
More than the ambient pressure
 
  • #4
Raresss said:
More than the ambient pressure
Pressure "under" what? Do you mean when it's running out?
 
  • #5
The OP just means the thrust produced by air escaping from a cylinder of compressed air.

Most people in my country understand "under" to mean "due to". As in "The bridge failed under the weight of traffic".
 
  • #7
CWatters said:
The OP just means the thrust produced by air escaping from a cylinder of compressed air.

Most people in my country understand "under" to mean "due to". As in "The bridge failed under the weight of traffic".
I can see that now. In English, underpressure and "underweight" (compound words) have different meanings from when the two words are separated by a space; hence my confusion. If this were a German forum, things might be different. . . :smile:
 
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  • #8
Can the mass flow rate and the velocity of the exhausted gas be calculated or those can only be measured in an experiment ?
 
  • #9
Raresss said:
Can the mass flow rate and the velocity of the exhausted gas be calculated or those can only be measured in an experiment ?

Bernoulli should be a good approximation.

sophiecentaur said:
If this were a German forum, things might be different. . . :smile:

Not really. "Unterdruck" instead of "unter Druck" would result in the same confusion.
 
  • #10
Would it not just be the pressure in the tank x the area of the orifice?
I.E. If the pressure is 1 Mpa (above ambient) and the orifice is 12mm then the thrust should be 1 Newton, right?
 
  • #11
mrspeedybob said:
Would it not just be the pressure in the tank x the area of the orifice?
I.E. If the pressure is 1 Mpa (above ambient) and the orifice is 12mm then the thrust should be 1 Newton, right?
Your force is the normal force, and your pressure is the surface pressure. We can't use those in my problem. The thrust is based on other variables . Check out this link to find out more : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thrust
 

Related to Thrust of an underpressure tank of air

What is the "thrust" of an underpressure tank of air?

The thrust of an underpressure tank of air refers to the force generated by the pressurized air inside the tank. This force is typically measured in Newtons (N) and is responsible for propelling the tank and any attached objects in the opposite direction.

How is the thrust of an underpressure tank of air calculated?

The thrust of an underpressure tank of air is calculated using the formula F = PA, where F is the force in Newtons, P is the pressure in pascals (Pa), and A is the cross-sectional area of the tank's opening in square meters (m^2).

What factors affect the thrust of an underpressure tank of air?

The thrust of an underpressure tank of air is affected by several factors, including the pressure inside the tank, the cross-sectional area of the tank's opening, and the mass of the air being expelled. Additionally, the shape and design of the tank can also impact the thrust generated.

How does the thrust of an underpressure tank of air compare to that of an overpressure tank?

The thrust generated by an underpressure tank of air is typically lower than that of an overpressure tank. This is because the air inside an underpressure tank is being sucked out, while the air in an overpressure tank is being pushed out, resulting in a greater force.

How is the thrust of an underpressure tank of air used in practical applications?

The thrust generated by an underpressure tank of air is used in various practical applications, such as in pneumatic devices, rocket engines, and air-powered tools. It is also an important factor in the design and functioning of vacuum cleaners and air compressors.

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