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Thrust Vectoring

  1. Feb 26, 2005 #1
    What is Thrust Vectoring and its applications? Does anyone who can explain it ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 26, 2005 #2

    cronxeh

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    Thrust vectoring is directing output stream using nozzles.

    Applications? SU-37 has the best thrust vectoring example
    http://altnet.ru/~military/avia/istrib/Su-37/Su-37(9).jpg

    Those nozzles can move around and direct the exhaust and therefore make sharper and faster turns on an airplane

    Another example of thrust vectoring is on F/A-22, and F/A 18 (I think)
     
  4. Feb 27, 2005 #3

    FredGarvin

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    The buzz words used around thrust vectoring is "super maneuverability." The joint strike fighter also uses an extreme version of thrust vectoring (90°) to accomplish vertical takeoffs.
     
  5. Mar 14, 2005 #4
    The F/A 18 doesn't have thrust vectoring. All the F-14/15/16/18 have nozzles that narrow as the throttle pushes to afterburner, but they don't vector.

    Only the F-35 and the F/A-22 have thrust vectoring. And the SU-37, which is sweet with the vectoring. I saw a tape of it do a loop with thrust vectoring, the plane was actually moving backwards, exhaust first, at one point in the loop. It can also rotate about the axis that is parallel to the wings, perpendicular to the engines.
     
  6. Mar 14, 2005 #5

    cronxeh

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    I stand corrected. However, NASA did modify it to make an experimental F-18 HARV
    http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/research/HARV/rd.html I'm not sure where I've seen the thrust vectoring F18 but this could be it..
     
  7. Mar 14, 2005 #6
    I keep forgeting how an after burner works. Does it just mix all of the inake air with the fuel mixture or what? I remeber hearing about it but I keep forgetting.

    Regards,

    Nenad
     
  8. Mar 14, 2005 #7

    FredGarvin

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    They mix bypass air with additional fuel added downstream of the turbines.
     
  9. Mar 14, 2005 #8
    so the after burners do not increase the turbofan rpm, or the turbine rpm. It just combusts and uses the extra exaust gas as a thrust force, kind of like on a rocket.
    Is this correct?

    Regards,

    Nenad
     
  10. Mar 14, 2005 #9
    That looks like a test aircraft to test thrust vectoring. It seems like NASA does a lot of tests like that.

    For sure not a production aircraft though.

    Interesting article though.
     
  11. Mar 14, 2005 #10

    FredGarvin

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    That is correct. To be more precise it is like adding a ramjet to the back end of a turbofan.
     
  12. Mar 14, 2005 #11
    thanks fred. You've been really helpfull.

    Regards,

    Nenad
     
  13. Apr 22, 2005 #12
    info required in detail about thrust vectoring

    HI!!! Iam a masters student in aeronautical engg. would any one please send me some detailed information about thrust vectoring.
    I need it for my seminar purpose
    thnx
     
  14. Apr 22, 2005 #13
    I think the F-35 only thrust vectors at like an 80 degree angle, not sure what it is, but it isn't 90. It is pretty cool though.

    I would recommend google to find detailed info on thrust vectoring.

    I have seen that SU-37 video as well. It does indeed rotate about the axis parallel to the wings, and flies backwards at one point. I think if you were going to dogfight it, you better ripple a missle off fast, cause you can't keep up with it. I hope the USA has an aircraft that can keep pace soon.
     
  15. Apr 22, 2005 #14
    Suggest that you might want to look at launch vehicles and missiles. Most of these, not having wings or other airfoil surfaces, depend upon thrust vectoring. This can be done by either swing-ing the whole engine (many liquid-fueled types do it this way), by deflecting just the nozzle chamber (many solids) or by putting movable deflector baffles in the output flow stream.

    KM
     
  16. May 3, 2005 #15
    hi all,
    currently completing BSc Physics and have been reading the replies on thrust vectoring and have found plenty of info on google for my research project( particularly the X-31 and f-18 test A/C). My question is about the origins of thrust vectoring. did it come from some one looking at VSTOL (harrier) or from need to out maneuvering in a dog-fight?
     
  17. May 3, 2005 #16

    FredGarvin

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    Here's a pretty good historical link:
    http://www.harrier.org.uk/history/history_farley.htm

    Also, an interesting tid bit I came across here:
    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/av-8-history.htm
     
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