Too much cooling air? (Power supply failures due to condensation)

In summary, the conversation discusses a situation where 36 power supplies are failing due to moisture, despite being located in a room with a temperature of 30C and relative humidity of 45%. The failures were attributed to condensation forming inside the enclosure, possibly caused by negative pressure and airflow from cooling fans. The person requesting assistance has decades of experience designing power electronics but has never encountered this issue before. Additional questions are asked regarding the room's conditioning, temperature, and the possibility of relocating the cooling fans.
  • #1
powerelect
1
0
TL;DR Summary
condensation and dew point in electrical cabinet with high velocity air
I have a situation that I cannot explain so I need the assistance of someone with a good understanding of thermodynamics.

I have 36 AC to DC power supplies located in an equipment rack. These power supplies are failing after some time. The failures appear to be moisture related. We put moisture indicating labels in the power supply and their color changed indicating the presence of moisture.

We replaced the metal cover on the power supply with clear plexiglass and we also saw condensation form inside the enclosure after a number of hours. The environmental conditions were 30C and 45%RH. The dew point should be far below room temperature under these conditions. This was installed at a location close to sea level. There are large cooling fans on the cabinet door pulling air out of the cabinet.

So, the pressure inside the cabinet is negative. Could this large amount of airflow pulling through the unit cause the moisture in the air to condense? Could the negative pressure cause the dew point to drop? Can someone explain this? I have been designing power electronics for decades and have never seen this before.
 
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  • #2
Welcome, @powerelect ! :smile:

Is the room containing the panel conditioned?
If so, at what temperature?
Could you relocate the cooling fans to be blowing into the cabinet?
 

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