Total magnetic flux of a solenoid

In summary, the total flux through an amperian loop of radius greater than a solenoid's radius will be non-zero for an ideal solenoid, where the field outside the core is considered zero. However, for a real solenoid, the total flux will be zero because the field outside is not exactly zero and will cancel out some of the flux from the core. This cancellation will be exactly zero if the amperian loop has an infinitely large radius. This concept makes sense.
  • #1
There is a solenoid of a certain radius, carrying a certain current. I draw an amperian loop of radius greater than the radius of the solenoid. If I calculate the total flux through this loop it should be,

1) Non zero for an ideal solenoid (where the field outside the core of the solenoid is considered zero). Thus the only flux that will pass through the area of the loop will come from the core of the solenoid.

2) Zero for a real solenoid because the field outside the solenoid is not exactly zero (magnetic field lines will not just terminate outside the solenoid). Magnetic field lines, in reality, will continue outside the loop and return back to the core. And some of that flux will pass through the area of the amperian loop and cancel the some of flux from core of the solenoid. For an infinitely large radius of the amperian loop, it will be exactly zero because than ALL the flux will pass through the loop which will exactly cancel the oppositely directed flux from the core.

Does this make sense?
 
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  • #2
to me, yes it make sense..
 

1. What is the total magnetic flux of a solenoid?

The total magnetic flux of a solenoid is the measure of the strength of the magnetic field that is created by the solenoid. It is represented by the symbol Φ and is measured in units of Webers (Wb).

2. How is the total magnetic flux of a solenoid calculated?

The total magnetic flux of a solenoid can be calculated by multiplying the number of turns in the solenoid by the current passing through it and the area of the cross-section of the solenoid. This can be represented by the formula Φ = N * I * A, where N is the number of turns, I is the current, and A is the cross-sectional area.

3. What factors affect the total magnetic flux of a solenoid?

The total magnetic flux of a solenoid can be affected by the current passing through it, the number of turns in the solenoid, and the cross-sectional area of the solenoid. Additionally, the material and physical properties of the solenoid, such as its length and diameter, can also impact the total magnetic flux.

4. What is the significance of the total magnetic flux of a solenoid?

The total magnetic flux of a solenoid is important because it determines the strength of the magnetic field that the solenoid produces. This magnetic field is used in various applications, such as electromagnets, motors, and generators.

5. How can the total magnetic flux of a solenoid be increased?

The total magnetic flux of a solenoid can be increased by increasing the current passing through it, increasing the number of turns in the solenoid, or increasing the cross-sectional area of the solenoid. Additionally, using materials with higher magnetic permeability can also increase the total magnetic flux.

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