Transferring Data from Old PC to New PC (Both Win 10)

In summary, to transfer data from old to new PC, you could connect them with a SATA cable, or copy files to a USB drive and then move them to the new PC. Alternatively, you could use a network to copy files.
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WWGD

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Hi all,
So my old Win 10PC is slowing down and I am buying a new one. I want to transfer data from the old to the new without having to remove the HD. Wil just connecting the two PCs with a SATA cable enough to do the job? Is there a simpler, faster way?
 
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WWGD said:
Hi all,
So my old Win 10PC is slowing down and I am buying a new one. I want to transfer data from the old to the new without having to remove the HD. Wil just connecting the two PCs with a SATA cable enough to do the job? Is there a simpler, faster way?
jedishrfu said:
Honestly, I would get a large enough usb drive and copy your personal stuff to it and then use it to copy to the new machine.

Alternatively, you could place them both on your home network and copy files that way too.
Yeah.

So I literally just had this issue a couple of months ago. My Eclipse 2017 laptop came with a 128 GB SDD for the OS and a 1 TB spinner, and 128 GB just wasn't big enough anymore for the OS. After upgrading the SDD, I tried plugging it back in as an external drive, and it wasn't readable - didn't even show any data. The spinner neither. I never did figure out how to make them readable. Supposedly there's a way to fix security settings and take ownership, but I never got the data to appear. So I ended up swapping the old drive back in, copying everything off both, and starting from scratch with fresh drives on the new install.
 
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russ_watters said:
Yeah.

So I literally just had this issue a couple of months ago. My Eclipse 2017 laptop came with a 128 GB SDD for the OS and a 1 TB spinner, and 128 GB just wasn't big enough anymore for the OS. After upgrading the SDD, I tried plugging it back in as an external drive, and it wasn't readable - didn't even show any data. The spinner neither. I never did figure out how to make them readable. Supposedly there's a way to fix security settings and take ownership, but I never got the data to appear. So I ended up swapping the old drive back in, copying everything off both, and starting from scratch with fresh drives on the new install.
Would encryption do that?
 
  • #5
This is a bit off topic. I wish PCs and Macs would make the process as smooth as Android phones. The last time I got a new phone, there was a transfer app. I put the old and new phones in close proximity. They detected each other and communicated wirelessly (audio? bluetooth? wifi? NFC? I don't know which, but I did not need any passwords). Then they transferred all data, files, pictures, address book, text messages, installed apps and app settings, custom parameters under settings, ring tones, the name and login for my mobile hotspot, all data in all categories. After 15 minutes, it was done.

Maybe iPhones can do the same. I don't know about iPhones.

If phones can do it, then laptop or desktop computers ought to be able to do the same. Lobby your suppliers.
 
  • #6
That assumes the old phone still worked. Last time I did this, the old phone was bricked.

The fundamental difference is that your phone has a much clearer idea of who it's one true owner is than a PC, which is much more likely to be shared. This leads to other differences, like which and how much data is on disks owned by Google vs. disks owned by you.
 
  • #7
Would therebe a way of copying a restore point from PC1 to PC2? Or copying the registry file? Would we use some Ghosting program? Sorry if I (seem ?) lazy, just don't think I know enough to filter advice from online searches on the topic.
 
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WWGD said:
Would therebe a way of copying a restore point from PC1 to PC2?
Sure, but the restore point is a collection of files. This is no easier than moving the original files.

Why won't the solution @jedishrfu posted work for you?
 
  • #9
Vanadium 50 said:
Sure, but the restore point is a collection of files. This is no easier than moving the original files.

Why won't the solution @jedishrfu posted work for you?
I realized I just asked for how to transfer data, but I would prefer to be able to transfer settings as well. My bad for not thinkingnthis through when doing my original post.
 
  • #10
And some of those solutions do transfer settings. It's right there on the link.

Note that not all settings will transfer. For example, if you are using a LAN to transfer the data, you obviously can't transfer the network name.
 
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Transferring all settings from an old Windows PC (specifically the registry) is IMHO a bad idea: it is likely that there's some stuff in there that was slowing your old PC down, and the last thing you want to do with your bright shiny new PC is load it down with all that mess.

In fact you can often gain a significant improvement in performance of a Windows PC simply by reinstalling Windows (from scratch i.e. after reformatting the hard disk - and from the current Microsoft installation media, not anything provided by the PC's vendor which will include 'bloatware' slowing your machine down).
 
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So true for Windows in particular. I always felt the registry itself was bloatware with way too many keys and cross linkages. A very confusing database of metadata and program settings.
 
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On a connected topic, it seems likely that MS will announce the release of Windows 11 on Thursday (24 June 2021). Support for Windows 10 is likely to end in October 2025.

Support for [edit: most versions of] Windows 10 will end on 14 October 2025 (this is already announced).
 
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Is your PC a laptop? For my desktop PC I just put the old drive in the tower and copied files form one drive to the other. Now the second drive is my backup drive.
 
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anorlunda said:
If phones can do it, then laptop or desktop computers ought to be able to do the same. Lobby your suppliers.
Apple has Time Machine (since 2007), Migration Assistant and even a Windows Migration Assistant to handle this. There are also several tools for Windows as the link above shows.
 
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There exists a migration tool from microsoft that can copy your profile, applications & data from one computer to another. This can work either by copying data to an external HDD and then back onto the new PC or direct if you have a network connection between the 2 computers. I think it was called the User State Migration Tool.
 
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Svein said:
This tool: Laplink?
Good grief I remember when laplink came in a box with a parallel port crossover cable when that was the only practical way of transferring data in bulk between PCs.

These days everybody has a home network and paying for file transfer software is insane.
 
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pbuk said:
These days everybody has a home network and paying for file transfer software is insane.
The trouble with "File copy" across a network is that a small number of files will not get transferred (open files, hidden files, locked files etc.) Even backup programs have trouble here.
 
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Another problem with file transfers is that you must choose what to transfer. That can be tedious. No matter how much effort you use, there will still be doubt that you got it all.

That's why I liked the Samsung smart switch app so much. I start it, walk away, and 15 minutes later I had a clone. All needed categories of data and files were copied.
 
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pbuk said:
These days everybody has a home network and paying for file transfer software is insane.
Windows 10 does not support HomeGroup networking any more. I have to use a USB flash drive if I want anything printed from my laptop as my printer is connected to my old XP PC.
 
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darth boozer said:
Windows 10 does not support HomeGroup networking any more.
So what? Define your own workgroup and include your laptop and XP PC in it. Problem solved.
 
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Svein said:
So what? Define your own workgroup and include your laptop and XP PC in it. Problem solved.
That didn't work!
 
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darth boozer said:
That didn't work!
Hm. I have done that several times. If there is a problem, there is always something you have forgotten (like sharing out your printer).
 
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Svein said:
Hm. I have done that several times. If there is a problem, there is always something you have forgotten (like sharing out your printer).
File and printer sharing is enabled on both. The laptop uses WiFi to the router, the PC connects to the same router via Ethernet. The setup worked perfectly before the latest Win 10 update. Now, while they can both connect to the internet, they cannot "see" each other.
 
  • #26
You may need to enable the SMB 1.0 protocol on Windows 10.
 
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pbuk said:
You may need to enable the SMB 1.0 protocol on Windows 10.
Yes, I found that on another site. Also ended up with an update to the router firmware and now it's all working again. Even just discussing problems with others is a great help, thanks to all.
 
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Thank you all. A followup:
Can do both data backup and cloning in Windows 10, from Control Panel
Ended up doing a data backup on a Lexar USB. Cloning requires a different formatting for the USB.
Edit: Now comes the paranoia of losing the USB. I remember a friend that connected it to his key ring. Will try that, though I carry my keys in my pocket and the drive will take a beating when I take it out and put it back in.

Path is : Control Panel\System and Security\Backup and Restore (Windows 7)

I guess I will have to buy another USB and use NTFS instead of FAT32 .

I guess it's not possible to use different partitions for different sectors?
 
  • #29
What? Why are you carrying it around? You should stash it in a safe place. If you have a bank box place it there. Just find a safe place.

You could store it in your car but would likely need to protect it from the heat or cold using a box of some sort. If you have a musical instrument with carrying case, you could stash it there.

Its best NOT to store with or in something of value lest it be lost if that item is stolen.
 
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  • #30
WWGD said:
I guess it's not possible to use different partitions for different sectors?
It's not impossible e.g. to emulate multiple devices on a single device; a partition table is just 1s and 0s -- it doesn't directly affect the moving parts of the hardware.
 
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WWGD said:
I guess it's not possible to use different partitions for different sectors?
Do you mean different formats for different partitions? Yes of course; you can set this up in Disk Management.
 
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pbuk said:
Do you mean different formats for different partitions? Yes of course; you can set this up in Disk Management.
So I can partition the USB?
 
  • #33
WWGD said:
So I can partition the USB?
Sure. It will have to be a big one if you are planning to clone a Windoze installation onto it though.

Why not just put the old SSD in an external caddy?
 
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