Troubleshooting My Orion 130 Reflector

In summary: Astro Societies are great for this because they come with a variety of different eyepieces. However, if you can't use an eyepiece with a long eye relief, a telescope that comes with an Astro Society eyepiece may not be a good option for you. Have you tried using a different eyepiece?
  • #1
Brian Muller
2
0
I have an Orion 130 reflector. Never had a telescope before. The field of view is about a quarter inch through the focuser with the 25 mm eyepiece. Does anybody know what I am doing wrong or if there is something wrong with the telescope itself? I'm at my wit's end. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2
Hi Brian, welcome to PF.
One thing that comes to mind is that the eyepiece is not inserted properly. Perhaps the mounting screws were not unscrewed fully before inserting the eyepiece, so that it sits higher in the focuser than it should (i.e. it's resting on the screws).
 
  • Like
Likes Brian Muller
  • #3
Brian Muller said:
I have an Orion 130 reflector. Never had a telescope before. The field of view is about a quarter inch through the focuser with the 25 mm eyepiece. Does anybody know what I am doing wrong or if there is something wrong with the telescope itself? I'm at my wit's end. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
"A quarter of an inch" doesn't really mean anything in this context, so it is tough to tell what you really mean. Did the scope come with a 10mm eyepiece too? Are you saying it's a worse view through the 25mm than the 10mm? What do you see when you look at the moon, for example; can you see the whole thing?

Do you have glasses or might your eye otherwise be too far from the eyepiece?
 
  • #4
Brian Muller said:
I have an Orion 130 reflector. Never had a telescope before. The field of view is about a quarter inch through the focuser with the 25 mm eyepiece. Does anybody know what I am doing wrong or if there is something wrong with the telescope itself? I'm at my wit's end. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

The field of view through a telescope is usually only a few degrees at best. Often even less than that. I can barely see the entirety of the full moon through one of my telescopes, even with my widest angle eyepiece inserted, and the Moon is only half a degree in diameter.

One of the things you need with any telescope is a smaller 'finder scope' attached to the side. This small scope should have a much larger field of view and, if you have aligned the finder scope with the main scope, should make it much easier to find what you're looking for in the sky. If you have one, make sure to align it with the main scope during the daytime, as it will be nearly impossible to do so at night.
 
  • #5
If I'm not mistaken, I believe he means that when looking through the eye piece only a small amount of area is viewable. Not sure how to put it but when he should be able to see "O" he is only able to see "o" instead with the surrounding area being blacked out. So somewhere there is a misalignment.
 
  • Like
Likes Brian Muller
  • #6
Thanks! The eye piece is in correct. I think it is my eye relief. My eye sight is not what it used to be. My dad can see through it fine. My eye has to be almost touching the lens to see it fill up. Thinking about getting a camera Mount and try that out and put it on my computer screen. In the meantime, I'm going to see if I can see anything on the next clear night. I will get back to you all. It's much appreciated!
 
  • #7
Brian Muller said:
My eye has to be almost touching the lens to see it fill up.

That's normal.
 
  • Like
Likes davenn
  • #8
Drakkith said:
That's normal.
...and it is common for cheap eyepieces (like what can come with a budget telescope) to have really poor eye relief. you may want to consider buying a replacement.
 
  • #9
russ_watters said:
...and it is common for cheap eyepieces (like what can come with a budget telescope) to have really poor eye relief. you may want to consider buying a replacement.
And for some very expensive eyepieces! I use spectacles and cannot use some optically excellent Pentax and Televue eyepieces specifically because the eye relief is too short.
 
  • Like
Likes russ_watters
  • #10
AndyG said:
I use spectacles and cannot use some optically excellent Pentax and Televue eyepieces specifically because the eye relief is too short.
Have you tried without spectacles? This wouldn't be a solution if you have strong astigmatism but it could be worth trying. You can get your eye much closer to the EP that way.
 
  • #11
It's not a problem for me - I can view without specs but I choose not to for various reasons. I use other eyepieces (and binoculars) with longer eye relief and they are great for me. It's one reason why Astro Societies are so useful - you can try other prople's equipment and sometimes borrow things to try which saves making expensive mistakes. My favourite Leica zooms were about £750 new when I bought them as used (but still expensive) items and I have some £30 eyepieces which are also great. My other half's favoutite eyepiece is a £10 plossl! Where possible, try before you buy and see what works *for you*!
 
  • #12
AndyG said:
It's not a problem for me - I can view without specs but I choose not to for various reasons. I use other eyepieces (and binoculars) with longer eye relief and they are great for me. It's one reason why Astro Societies are so useful - you can try other prople's equipment and sometimes borrow things to try which saves making expensive mistakes. My favourite Leica zooms were about £750 new when I bought them as used (but still expensive) items and I have some £30 eyepieces which are also great. My other half's favoutite eyepiece is a £10 plossl! Where possible, try before you buy and see what works *for you*!
It surprises me that, with all your apparent experience of eyepieces, you are quoting "a quarter of an inch" as a field of view. Field is expressed as an angle or it doesn't mean a lot.
 
  • Like
Likes davenn and russ_watters

1. How do I collimate my Orion 130 reflector telescope?

Collimation is the process of aligning the mirrors in a telescope to ensure optimal image quality. To collimate your Orion 130 reflector, first make sure the telescope is set up on a stable surface. Then, use a collimation tool or a Cheshire eyepiece to adjust the primary and secondary mirrors until the reflection of the primary mirror is centered in the reflection of the secondary mirror. It may take a few iterations to achieve perfect collimation.

2. Why am I experiencing blurry images with my Orion 130 reflector?

Blurry images can be caused by a few different factors. First, make sure the telescope is properly collimated. If the mirrors are not aligned, it can result in blurry images. Additionally, check the focus knob to make sure it is adjusted correctly. If the telescope is still producing blurry images, it could be due to atmospheric conditions or incorrect eyepiece selection.

3. How can I improve the viewing experience with my Orion 130 reflector?

There are a few ways to enhance your viewing experience with the Orion 130 reflector. First, make sure the telescope is set up in a dark location with minimal light pollution. This will allow for clearer and more detailed views. Additionally, invest in high-quality eyepieces and filters, which can greatly improve the clarity and contrast of celestial objects.

4. What should I do if my Orion 130 reflector is not focusing properly?

If you are having trouble achieving focus with your telescope, check the focus knob to make sure it is adjusted correctly. If the telescope still will not focus, it could be due to the collimation being off or the eyepiece being incompatible with the telescope. Make sure the mirrors are properly aligned and try using a different eyepiece to see if that improves the focus.

5. How can I troubleshoot issues with the mount of my Orion 130 reflector?

If you are experiencing problems with the mount of your telescope, make sure it is set up correctly and on a stable surface. Check all knobs and screws to ensure they are tightened appropriately. If the mount is still not functioning properly, it could be due to a defect or damage and may need to be repaired or replaced by the manufacturer.

Similar threads

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
25
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
14
Views
5K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
27
Views
5K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
32
Views
4K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
5
Views
3K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
5
Views
3K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
2
Replies
60
Views
8K
Back
Top