Turbo Charger Design: Compressor and Turbine Blades

In summary: This means that there is more resistance to the air passing through the turbine and the engine can run a little hotter.
  • #1
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Hello can anyone please provide me with some insight about turbo charger design? Specifically referring to the compressor and turbine blades? My inquiry is more directly aimed at the number of blades. On different turbos they use different numbers of blades and I'm wondering if a higher number of blade offers any better performance over a identically configured turbo with a lower number of blades.

I have attached 3 images below. The first being a compressor side with a high number of blades, the second being a compressor side with a low number of blades, and the third being a turbine side with a high number of blades. It is important to note that the turbine side of a turbocharger is universally equipped with a high number of blades.

I would assume that a higher number of blades would provide a more uniform flow whereas a lower number of blades would provide more of a relatively pulsed flow. Also I would assume with all variables being equal between 2 turbos and only the number of blades being changed, that the turbo with the higher number of blades would provide more air flow.

I am no where near an expert and I hope someone with some knowledge will enlighten me. I thank you dearly for your time.
 

Attachments

  • Compressor Hi.jpg
    Compressor Hi.jpg
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  • Compressor Low.jpg
    Compressor Low.jpg
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  • Turbine .jpg
    Turbine .jpg
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  • #2
Simple answer: No. When you design turbomachinery, you must not think in terms of a succession of blades but in a succession of "ducts" (the blade being the walls that separates those ducts).

The duct's shape change the directions of the air going through it and that's what puts energy in the air (compressor) or removes it (turbine).

the angle of the blades are dependent of the rotational speed of the turbine, the inlet velocity of the air and the pressure ratio we want to achieve. If the found angle to design the blade is very large (like in your 2nd picture) the blades will be very close together, hence you will need less of them to create the "perfect" width for your ducts. If you take the 2 extreme cases of the blades having an initial angle of 0° and 90° with respect to the flow, in the first case the width of the duct is the distance between 2 blades and in the second case the width will be zero since all blades are perpendicular to the flow.
 
  • #3
I'm pretty sure that if you look closely at the second picture, you'll see that the impeller has twelve blades. There is a shorter blade between each of the visible (from the top) blades.
 
  • #4
mender said:
I'm pretty sure that if you look closely at the second picture, you'll see that the impeller has twelve blades. There is a shorter blade between each of the visible (from the top) blades.

You are correct. Many compressor wheels are made in that fashion. I was more concerned with the surface area relative to more blades then the actual amount of them.
 
  • #5
Another consideration is that the more blades there are, the less area there is to pass flow through. The more walls that divide up the flow, the more frictional areas there are.
 

1. What is a turbocharger and how does it work?

A turbocharger is a device that uses exhaust gas from a vehicle's engine to compress additional air into the combustion chamber. This results in increased power and efficiency of the engine. The turbocharger works by using a turbine and compressor, which are connected by a shaft. The turbine is powered by the exhaust gas, while the compressor uses the energy from the turbine to compress the air.

2. What are the main components of a turbocharger?

The main components of a turbocharger are the compressor, turbine, shaft, and bearings. The compressor and turbine are the two main components responsible for boosting the engine's performance. The shaft connects the compressor and turbine, and the bearings allow for smooth rotation of the shaft.

3. How are compressor and turbine blades designed?

Compressor and turbine blades are designed using advanced computer software and aerodynamic principles. The blades are carefully shaped and angled to efficiently compress and expand air as it passes through the turbocharger. The material used for the blades is also carefully chosen to withstand high temperatures and stresses.

4. What factors affect the performance of compressor and turbine blades?

The performance of compressor and turbine blades can be affected by several factors, such as the shape and size of the blades, the material they are made of, the speed of rotation, and the temperature and pressure of the air passing through them. Any changes in these factors can impact the efficiency and power output of the turbocharger.

5. How do engineers improve the design of compressor and turbine blades?

Engineers are constantly working to improve the design of compressor and turbine blades to increase the efficiency and performance of turbochargers. This is done through extensive research and testing, as well as advancements in materials and manufacturing techniques. Computer simulations are also used to optimize the design and performance of these blades before they are physically produced.

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