Understand Einstein & Lorentz: E=mc2 & ϒ Formula

In summary, the conversation discusses the combination of Einstein's equation E=mc2 and Lorentz's factor ϒ=1/√1-(v2/c2) to further prove the light-speed barrier in the field of temporal physics. However, it is explained that both these relationships are derived from the same assumptions as the light-speed limit, so combining them does not provide any new insights. Additionally, it is mentioned that the energy equation can be written as E=γmc2, with the common equation only being valid for particles at rest. The conversation also mentions the possibility of tachyons and asks for recommendations for further readings.
  • #1
Jorlack
3
0
I am hoping someone can help me with something. I want to go into the field of temporal physics and I was wondering if someone could help me understand why Einstein's E=mc2 isn't combined with Lorentz's factor ϒ=1/√1-(v2/c2) to further prove the light-speed barrier?
 
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  • #2
Jorlack said:
I was wondering if someone could help me understand why Einstein's E=mc2 isn't combined with Lorentz's factor ϒ=1/√1-(v2/c2) to further prove the light-speed barrier?

Both of these relationships are derived from the same underlying assumptions (the two postulates of special relativity - Google for "On the electrodynamics of moving bodies" to find Einstein's 1905 paper on SR) as the light-speed limit. Thus, using them to "further prove" the lightspeed limit doesn't tell us anything new; it just shows that the assumptions that lead to the light-speed limit lead to the light-speed limit.
 
  • #3
Also the relation [itex]E=mc^2[/itex] is already given at a certain Reference fram (the rest frame of the object of mass [itex]m[/itex] ). So how would you put a gamma factor?
 
  • #4
T
Nugatory said:
Both of these relationships are derived from the same underlying assumptions (the two postulates of special relativity - Google for "On the electrodynamics of moving bodies" to find Einstein's 1905 paper on SR) as the light-speed limit. Thus, using them to "further prove" the lightspeed limit doesn't tell us anything new; it just shows that the assumptions that lead to the light-speed limit lead to the light-speed limit.
Thank you for the reference, Nugatory. Also, could you recommend any books or sights that are credited and discus the possibility of Tachyons?
 
  • #5
Jorlack, you are right. One way of writing the energy equation is
##E=\gamma m c^2##
The common equation ##E=mc^2## is only valid for particles at rest, when ##\gamma = 1##.
 
  • #6
Khashishi said:
Jorlack, you are right. One way of writing the energy equation is
##E=\gamma m c^2##
The common equation ##E=mc^2## is only valid for particles at rest, when ##\gamma = 1##.
##\gamma = 1## when the velocity of the said object or particle is 0. Therefore the Lorentz factor would equal ##1/1## or simply, 1.
 

What is the significance of the equation E=mc2?

The equation E=mc2, also known as the mass-energy equivalence equation, is significant because it shows that mass and energy are two forms of the same thing. It explains the relationship between mass and energy and how they can be converted into one another.

Who came up with the equation E=mc2?

The equation E=mc2 was introduced by Albert Einstein in 1905 as part of his theory of special relativity. However, it was not until later that he fully understood the implications of the equation and its significance in explaining the relationship between mass and energy.

What is the Lorentz factor (ϒ) and how is it related to E=mc2?

The Lorentz factor (ϒ) is a mathematical term used to calculate the effects of time dilation and length contraction in Einstein's theory of special relativity. It is related to E=mc2 because it is used to determine the amount of energy needed to accelerate an object to the speed of light.

Can E=mc2 be applied to everyday situations?

Yes, E=mc2 can be applied to everyday situations. For example, it explains how nuclear energy is produced through the conversion of mass into energy. It also plays a role in technologies such as nuclear power plants and medical imaging devices.

What are some misconceptions about E=mc2?

One common misconception about E=mc2 is that it can be used to create unlimited amounts of energy. However, the equation only applies to the conversion of mass into energy and not the other way around. Another misconception is that the speed of light (c) is a constant value, when in fact it can vary depending on the medium it is traveling through.

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