Understanding 2012 VP113's Perihelion and Its Significance in Planetary Origins

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In summary: This suggests that 2012 VP113 has a unique orbit compared to other bodies in our solar system. This could provide important information about its origin and there may be other bodies with similar odd properties. In summary, 2012 VP113 has a highly elliptic orbit that does not lie in the orbital plane of the hypothetical accretion disk, yet its perihelion occurs in the same plane as the major planets. This could be significant in understanding its origin and there may be other bodies with similar characteristics.
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Despite having a highly elliptic orbit not being in the orbital plane of the hypothetical accretion disk, 2012 VP113 has its perihelion as it crosses the SS plane. That would imply that its line of apsides lies in the orbital plane of the major planets. That may be an unlikely accident but probably is important information.

How can this be explained and what does it tell us about it's origin? Are there other bodies which also have this odd property?
 
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fizzy said:
Despite having a highly elliptic orbit not being in the orbital plane of the hypothetical accretion disk, 2012 VP113 has its perihelion as it crosses the SS plane. That would imply that its line of apsides lies in the orbital plane of the major planets. That may be an unlikely accident but probably is important information.

How can this be explained and what does it tell us about it's origin? Are there other bodies which also have this odd property?
According to this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_VP113
The argument of perihelion is 293.72°. The argument of perihelion is the measure between the ascending node ( where the orbit crosses the ecliptic) and the perihelion. For the perihelion to occur on the ecliptic, it would have to be at either the descending or ascending node and the argument of perihelion would be either 0° or 180°
 

1. What is the significance of 2012 VP113's perihelion?

The perihelion of a celestial object is the point in its orbit that is closest to the sun. In the case of 2012 VP113, its perihelion is significant because it is the closest point in its orbit to the sun, and therefore can provide valuable information about the object's composition, behavior, and relationship to other objects in the solar system.

2. How far is 2012 VP113 from the sun at perihelion?

At its perihelion, 2012 VP113 is approximately 80 astronomical units (AU) away from the sun. This is significantly further than the average distance of Pluto, which is about 39 AU from the sun.

3. What is the orbital period of 2012 VP113?

The orbital period, or the time it takes for an object to complete one orbit around the sun, of 2012 VP113 is estimated to be around 4,000 years. This is much longer than the orbital period of any known planet in our solar system.

4. How was the perihelion of 2012 VP113 discovered?

The perihelion of 2012 VP113 was discovered through observations made with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The object was first detected in 2012, and its perihelion was calculated based on subsequent observations.

5. What can we learn from studying 2012 VP113's perihelion?

Studying 2012 VP113's perihelion can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of the outer solar system. It can also help us understand the origins of other distant objects, such as dwarf planets, comets, and asteroids, and their relationship to the sun and other planets in our solar system.

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