Unit Vector of Blocks Momentum

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a block of ice sliding on a slippery floor and being kicked at a perpendicular angle. The questions asked are about the direction and magnitude of the block's momentum after the kick, as well as its z component. The diagram provided is used to calculate the unit vector and solve the problem. The x-component of the block's momentum after the kick is also mentioned.
  • #1
rcm431
1
0
Hello everyone, new to the forums but I have used the information here for help in the past. Having trouble with a specific part of a problem.1. A 0.65 kg block of ice is sliding by you on a very slippery floor at 2.5 m/s. As it goes by, you give it a kick perpendicular to its path. Your foot is in contact with the ice block for 0.0025 seconds. The block eventually slides at an angle of 28 degrees from its original direction. The overhead view shown in the diagram is approximately to scale. The arrow represents the average force your toe applies briefly to the block of ice.

A. What is the unit vector in the direction of the block's momentum after the kick?

B. What is the magnitude of the block's momentum after the kick?

C. What is the z component of the blocks momentum after the kick?

2.p^^\-> = abs(p^^\->) p^^\^...p^^\-> = m*v^^\->
3. The ice is sliding as if you are looking down on it (the y-axis), and the kick being in the positive z direction, and the ice sliding in the positive x direction. I know if I find the unit vector of the block's momentum it will be easy to calculate the rest of the problem, part A is the part I am having trouble with.

I calculated the x-component of the block's momentum after the kick which is 1.625 kgm/s


Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
 
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  • #2
rcm431 said:
The block eventually slides at an angle of 28 degrees from its original direction.
They just want a unit vector in this direction. (This part of the problem doesn't require any knowledge of momentum, since they give you the direction.)

If you need more help, please attach the diagram.
 
  • #3


Hello, it seems like you are working on a problem involving the momentum of a block of ice after being kicked at an angle. I can provide some guidance and clarification on the concept of a unit vector and how it relates to momentum.

A unit vector is a vector with a magnitude of 1 and is used to indicate direction. In this case, the unit vector in the direction of the block's momentum after the kick would be in the same direction as the momentum itself. So, if the block's momentum is in the positive x direction, the unit vector would also be in the positive x direction. This would also be the direction of the block's velocity after the kick.

To find the magnitude of the block's momentum after the kick, you can use the equation P = m*v, where P is momentum, m is mass, and v is velocity. In this case, the mass is given as 0.65 kg and the velocity is 2.5 m/s. So, the magnitude of the block's momentum would be 1.625 kgm/s, as you have calculated.

The z component of the block's momentum after the kick would be zero, as there is no motion in the z direction. The block is only moving in the x and y directions.

I hope this helps with your problem. If you have any further questions, please let me know. Good luck with your calculations!
 

Related to Unit Vector of Blocks Momentum

What is a unit vector of blocks momentum?

A unit vector of blocks momentum is a vector that represents the momentum of a system of blocks, where each block is treated as a point mass. It is a normalized vector with a magnitude of 1, and its direction represents the direction of the momentum.

How is the unit vector of blocks momentum calculated?

The unit vector of blocks momentum is calculated by dividing the total momentum of the system by its magnitude. This can be represented mathematically as:

u = p / |p|

where u is the unit vector, p is the total momentum, and |p| is the magnitude of the momentum.

Why is the unit vector of blocks momentum important?

The unit vector of blocks momentum is important because it helps us understand the direction of the momentum in a system of blocks. It can also be used to calculate the total momentum of the system, which is a crucial quantity in understanding the motion and interactions of the blocks.

How does the unit vector of blocks momentum relate to Newton's laws of motion?

The unit vector of blocks momentum is directly related to Newton's laws of motion. Newton's first law states that an object will remain in a state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force. The unit vector of blocks momentum represents the direction and magnitude of the momentum, which is a measure of the motion of the blocks. This can help us determine if the blocks will remain in motion or come to a rest based on the external forces acting on them.

Can the unit vector of blocks momentum change?

Yes, the unit vector of blocks momentum can change if there is a change in the total momentum of the system or if the direction of the momentum changes. This can happen if there is a force acting on the blocks or if there is a collision between two or more blocks. However, the magnitude of the unit vector will always remain 1, as it is a normalized vector.

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