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Vascularization muscle tissue and fat tissue

  1. Oct 7, 2005 #1
    Hey Moonbear and other Physio types,

    Do equal volumes of muscle tissue and fat tissue have equal vascularization? how about equal masses of the two?

    If one body type (muscular) requires more vascularization than another (fat), that means greater blood volume, correct or incorrect?

    Does greater blood volume mean a greater requirement for iron, in one's diet?

    ~~~

    Another way to ask the question is this: If someone who is out of shape significantly increases their muscle mass through weight training, but doesn't change their general size or weight (just develops more lean tissue and has less fatty tissue), would that person need to increase their iron intake in order to avoid anemic symptoms?
     
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  3. Oct 7, 2005 #2

    Moonbear

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    Patty, I am not certain of the answer, I'd have to look into it. But my gut instinct is that muscle would be more vascularized than fat. Even if it isn't, the function of fat is to store energy, while the function of muscle requires using energy, and also requires more oxygen supply to support the use of that energy, so if someone has gained a lot of lean muscle mass while losing fat, without adjusting their nutrient intake, I would think it's possible to develop anemia...especially if their iron intake was just borderline sufficient in the first place (if they had been consuming excess already, it might not matter).

    Cardiovascular and muscle physiology are not my strengths, so I'd have to poke around to confirm this hunch...pubmed has been inaccessible all day for me...not sure if it's a university server problem, or a pubmed site problem. (Is anyone else having problems accessing pubmed today?)
     
  4. Oct 7, 2005 #3
    Those are my gut instincts too....

    Don't spend time on it if you don't have the time to spend, I'm mostly just curious. I would think that generally, higher metabolism=higher energy, on the other hand I can see how you *might* become anemic if, like you say, your iron intake is borderline to begin with.
     
  5. Oct 8, 2005 #4

    somasimple

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    Hi,
    Normally muscle requires more blood supply/vasculature.
    There is the chest exception.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2005 #5

    Moonbear

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    Can you elaborate on this please?
     
  7. Oct 10, 2005 #6

    somasimple

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    Hi,

    The chest is a fat tissue and endocrin one. It contains glands that produce milk. In consequence, it is a fat tissue with more vasculature than other fat tissue.
     
  8. Oct 10, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

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    Oh, then you meant breast tissue, not chest. Chest would refer to anything in the thorax/thoracic cavity. That explains the confusion.
     
  9. Oct 10, 2005 #8

    somasimple

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    Sorry for this foreign language confusion.
     
  10. Oct 10, 2005 #9

    Moonbear

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    No problem. That's why I asked for clarification, and your explanation was all that was needed to figure out that was the source of confusion.
     
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