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I Vector field:one aspect that everyone knows but nobody shown

  1. Dec 9, 2015 #1
    Why a generic vector field produces repulsive forces between charges of the same sign? And where can I find a book or a paper in which it is shown?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2015 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Calculate e-e- scattering and e+e- scattering and take the non relativistic limit. It's probably in every book.
     
  4. Dec 9, 2015 #3

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

  5. Dec 9, 2015 #4
    Thanks, but your answer is equivalent to: take like charges and calculate the Coulomb force. My question is more general
     
  6. Dec 9, 2015 #5

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    His answer is very appropriate for an "advanced" level response, which is what you asked for by marking the thread as "A". I will adjust the level of the question to more appropriately reflect what you are looking for.
     
  7. Dec 9, 2015 #6
    in many books of general relativity I found the statement: a vector field produces repulsive forces between like charges so can not be used to describe gravity ...
     
  8. Dec 9, 2015 #7

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    I have never seen such a statement. Can you provide the reference.
     
  9. Dec 9, 2015 #8
    Gasperini, Maurizio. Relatività Generale e Teoria della Gravitazione. Springer Milan, 2015. pag:27
    the English version should be: Gasperini, Maurizio. Theory of Gravitational interactions. Springer Science & Business Media, 2013. at the chapter: "Towards a relativistic theory of gravitation".
    I found the same assertion in other books, I will send you more references
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  10. Dec 9, 2015 #9
    I'm trying to understand why a vector field can not be used to describe gravity. Not because the force of Coulumb is so defined or because the Lagrangian of the electromagnetic field leads to Bhabha scattering...
     
  11. Dec 9, 2015 #10
    Hobson, Michael Paul, George P. Efstathiou, and Anthony N. Lasenby.General relativity: an introduction for physicists. Cambridge University Press, 2006. pag:191
    "A gravitational theory based on a vector field can be eliminated since such a theory
    predicts that two massive particles would repel one another, rather than attract."

    Are you really sure my question is an "I" level?
     
  12. Dec 9, 2015 #11
    You have been so quick to downgrade my question ... but now you do not answer ... maybe do you want other references? Please answer me, is a very important question for me... thanks
     
  13. Dec 9, 2015 #12

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    I am closing this thread. You have opened a new one in the relativity forum which I think is a better place for it and is a better description of the question.
     
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