Voltage Division with Multiple Voltage Sources Seperated by Resistors

In summary, voltage division with multiple voltage sources separated by resistors is a method used to calculate the voltage drop across each resistor in a circuit. The total voltage is divided among the resistors based on their individual resistance values. This process allows for the determination of the voltage at any point in the circuit, making it a useful tool in circuit analysis and design. The formula for voltage division is V = (Rn / Rtotal) * Vtotal, where V is the voltage drop across a specific resistor, Rn is the resistance of that resistor, Rtotal is the total resistance of the circuit, and Vtotal is the total voltage of the circuit. This concept is crucial in understanding and predicting the behavior of circuits with multiple voltage sources and
  • #1
TheCarl
21
0

Homework Statement


Find the voltage across the 10 ohm resistor.
http://www.spacemonkeybrewing.com/images/circuit.jpg

Homework Equations



KVL - Sum of Voltages in a closed loop equal zero.
Ohms - V=IR
Voltage Divide - Va1 = (R1/(R1+R2...))Vs

The Attempt at a Solution



This is only the second week into the introduction of electrical circuits and I'm not sure where to start here. It doesn't look like I can use KVL, Ohms law or the voltage division equation to solve this problem. I would know how to solve it if it only had a single voltage source or voltage sources that aren't divided by resistors. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
 
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  • #2
Hi TheCarl, http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/5725/red5e5etimes5e5e45e5e25.gif

You can replace the 3 voltage sources by 1. Try that and see how you go. :smile:
 
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  • #3
So are you saying that basically the circuit above would be equivilant to this:
http://www.spacemonkeybrewing.com/images/circuit2.jpg

And therefore V = (10Ω/(15Ω+10Ω+20Ω+5Ω))6V = 6/5V ?P.S. Thanks for the quick reply.
 
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  • #4
TheCarl said:
And therefore V = (10Ω/(15Ω+10Ω+20Ω+5Ω))6V = 6/5V
That's the idea.
 
  • #5
Thank you so much!
 
  • #6
For future reference: your pic archive site seems slow or unreliable, and the pic is some of the time failing to appear. I venture that some people will be reading this and wondering where's the circuit we are discussing? For next time, I suggest that you try out another site, or else attach your pic to your post.
 
  • #7
Here are the two photos in order in case they don't show up in the above threads.
 

Attachments

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Related to Voltage Division with Multiple Voltage Sources Seperated by Resistors

1. What is voltage division with multiple voltage sources separated by resistors?

Voltage division with multiple voltage sources separated by resistors is a principle used to calculate the voltage drop across each resistor in a circuit when there are multiple voltage sources connected in series with resistors.

2. How does voltage division work?

According to Ohm's Law, the voltage drop across a resistor is directly proportional to the resistance and current flowing through it. In a series circuit, the total resistance is equal to the sum of individual resistances. Therefore, the voltage drop across each resistor is proportional to its resistance and inversely proportional to the total resistance of the circuit.

3. What is the equation for voltage division with multiple voltage sources and resistors?

The equation for voltage division is VR = VS x (RR / RT), where VR is the voltage drop across a specific resistor, VS is the total voltage, RR is the resistance of the specific resistor, and RT is the total resistance of the circuit.

4. Can voltage division work with both DC and AC circuits?

Yes, voltage division can be applied to both DC and AC circuits as long as they are in series. However, for AC circuits, the calculation becomes more complex as it involves the use of impedance instead of resistance.

5. What are some practical applications of voltage division with multiple voltage sources and resistors?

Voltage division is commonly used in electronic circuits to regulate voltage levels, control current flow, and protect components from voltage spikes. It is also used in various devices such as voltage dividers, potentiometers, and voltage regulators.

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