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Waters Abililty to Retain Co2

  1. Nov 24, 2009 #1
    I am currently under the impression that the Oceans act like a big sponge. They absorb CO2. However when the temperature rises it releases that CO2.

    Most reports give a rise of about 1 degree over the last half century.

    I am also aware that the ocean floor is littered with volcanoes, sea mounts, and is encircled by a huge rift which goes right up the Atlantic across the Pacific and around Antarctica.

    I am aware of no such force on the earth caused by man which could generate so much heat.

    How do people know global warming isn't a natural consequence of the environment changing rather than human influence?

    Specifically... This page says 31,000 scientists claim humans are not responsible for global warming.

    http://nov55.com/gbwm.html

    The petition.

    http://www.oism.org/pproject/

    My question is... Has anyone proven this beyond a shadow of a doubt that humans are indeed solely responsible for causing the climate change? If so... What percentage is a result of man, and what percentage is a result of natural climate change?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 24, 2009 #2

    sylas

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    Science does not prove things of this kind beyond a shadow of doubt.

    And anyway,humans are not solely responsible for climate change; climate depends on a range of factors, some of which are not associated with human activity. Good examples of non-human factors that impact on climate are large volcanoes, or decadal changes in things like the ENSO cycles.

    However, it is now established beyond reasonable doubt that:
    • The largest factor leading to a trends in a changing over recent decades is a strong increase in the greenhouse effect.
    • The major factor by far for change in the greenhouse effect are changes in atmospheric composition driven by human activities.

    This does not mean all the questions are solved, by any means. But it is a strong conclusion that human factors are the major cause for the trend of an increasing global mean temperature, and associated consequences.

    Cheers -- sylas
     
  4. Nov 24, 2009 #3
    Is there is a peer review paper which supports this? I am interested in learning more as I currently understand there are 31,000 scientists which feel it is not correct.

    Specifically, I am wondering if they've done things like link nuclear fallout to a increase or "ramp" in the greenhouse effect. Or if anyone has reproduced the greenhouse effect in a laboratory.

    Something more than a casual link but hard evidence which shows a direct correlation.

    I would also be very interested in learning if there is a petition from scientists who support global warming and are in direct opposition to the 31,000 petition signers who oppose it.

    Honestly, I mainly come across claims on the internet which refuse to reference proper sources, and the claims are very often strong enough that it worries me that perhaps people are not looking for the truth, and physically researching it but rather "believing" in a popular belief. However very often I come across studies which oppose the concept. It seems to be easier to find information on anti-global warming information rather than pro-global warming information. At least from seemingly credible and researched sources.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  5. Nov 24, 2009 #4

    DavidSnider

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    32,000 climate scientists?

    Who funded the study? (I bet you 100 bucks it was an institute funded by an oil company)
     
  6. Nov 24, 2009 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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