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What in your opinion is great?

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  1. Jun 9, 2016 #1
    Well searching for many days, I can't understand that what really people think of being great.
    Does it means that you are the conqueror of the world or you are the happiest man on earth.
    So what is your opinion on being great??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 9, 2016 #2

    "I know it when I see it." -- Lewis Powell.
     
  4. Jun 9, 2016 #3

    russ_watters

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    I enjoy it and highly recommend others try it.
     
  5. Jun 9, 2016 #4

    Evo

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    Russ took the words right out of my mouth!
     
  6. Jun 9, 2016 #5

    fresh_42

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    I know that Meat Loaf is big, but is he great?
     
  7. Jun 9, 2016 #6

    Evo

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    I've never had a truly great meat loaf.
     
  8. Jun 9, 2016 #7

    fresh_42

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    You should consider a visit to Germany.

    hackbraten.jpg
     
  9. Jun 9, 2016 #8

    Evo

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  10. Jun 9, 2016 #9

    jtbell

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    It's great to be great, of course, of course...
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  11. Jun 9, 2016 #10

    256bits

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    Grating your fingernails on a blackboard is GREAT for irritating people.
     
  12. Jun 12, 2016 #11
    I think ants are GREAT or really social insects in general!
     
  13. Jun 13, 2016 #12
    What is truly great is the mystery of how very heavy stones, some a hundred and two hundred tons, were quarried, transported, very accurately carved and very precisely positioned so many millennia ago that there are neither written nor oral records about them.

    Sacsayhuaman_wall1.jpg

    These sites include Sacsayhuaman, Cuzco, Peru; Ollantaytambo, Peru; Machu Picchu, Peru; the Giza Pyramids, Egypt; Tiahuanaco, Bolivia; Nan Madol, Pohnpei, Micronesia; Stonehenge, England; and Easter Island.

    These stones were clearly not carved by hand with bronze (or even steel) chisels. Nor were they moved with rope. Some try to say these are evidence of ancient aliens, but that's no different than throwing your arms up in despair.

    I'm fairly certain these were constructed with ancient technology and knowledge that was lost in the flood. Several structures, especially the temple at Ollantaytambo and a pyramid north of Giza, are clearly incomplete. The builders got caught in the flood.

    The mystery of how they did it is great.
     
  14. Jun 16, 2016 #13
    It's actually very well known how many of the examples you give were done.
     
  15. Jun 16, 2016 #14

    phinds

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    What flood?
     
  16. Jun 16, 2016 #15
    If it's the flood I'm thinking of, this thread won't last long.
     
  17. Jun 16, 2016 #16

    fresh_42

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    According to which reference frame?
     
  18. Jun 16, 2016 #17
    It's easy to give an answer that can't be verified or refuted, as many have done. But just look at that picture I posted from Sacsayhuaman. Look at the delicate curves in blocks weighing 100 tons or more that exactly match the delicate adjoining curves. It wasn't jostled into it's exact position with ropes without damaging the other rocks.

    The thread is about greatness and this is a GREAT mystery.
     
  19. Jun 16, 2016 #18
    Oh, grief. I just started looking at the hour-long video you posted. I fear there may be some confusion.

    By calling it a "mystery", I'm not implying that ancient humans didn't actually do it. And I've already gently rejected the ancient alien theory that the video also rejects. I'm merely stating that the knowledge needed to do it is now lost. We don't know how it was done. So it's a mystery. (And a GREAT one at that.)
     
  20. Jun 16, 2016 #19

    phinds

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    Yeah, me too.
     
  21. Jun 16, 2016 #20
    Nono, that's not why I posted the video. Yes, the video refutes the ancient alien theory, but it also goes into quite so detail as to how the constructions were performed.
     
  22. Jun 17, 2016 #21
    That video has some fascinating stuff in it. Especially the central shaft for building the pyramids. But he's kind of glibly dismissive. It was kind of funny that he dismissed some author for saying but not proving something when that's what he did too. In fact you just can't prove a lot of things. Even respected archeologists sometimes disagree on dates by millennia.

    If you think they could shape those blocks so they match exactly with stone tools and then position them with a bunch of Roman hoists, you have an awful lot of faith. I guess the little holes would have to be on the hidden edges like his preposterous suggestion for Baalbek. But that doesn't explain how you would get the rope out. It's just a heuristic without a plan.

    BTW, Gornaya Shoria in Siberia might have some blocks as heavy as 4000 tons. (I say "might" because some are trying to say these nice rectangular blocks in a wall high in the mountains are natural.) FOUR THOUSAND tons! That would take 800 Roman hoists on one block, with perfect weight distribution. It would take too much faith to believe that.

    It's still a GREAT mystery.
     
  23. Jun 17, 2016 #22
    It is completely plausable. And every alternative is completely ridiculous.

    Why don't you tell us how you think they did it?
     
  24. Jun 17, 2016 #23
    The book "American Prometheus, the triumph and tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer" is a "great" biography! :thumbup:
     
  25. Jun 17, 2016 #24
    oldmen you are great.
     
  26. Jun 17, 2016 #25
    That is EXACTLY the point! Very good. Except that the method you like is ridiculous too. It's a great mystery.

    BTW, in the video your guy threaded a rope through a channel in the top of one block to lift it. I know granite and limestone have unimaginably immense compression strength, but does it have enough tensile strength for that little sliver at the top to support a hundred tons? I notice he didn't prove it.

    And regardless of how the rope was rigged, the minimum breaking strength of a 2" steel cable is about 160 tons. Safety limits are well below that, so I suspect they had something much stronger than steel cable to lift these hundreds of tons.

    There's no disgrace in confessing we don't know the answer to a great mystery.
     
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