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I What is MUV of a galaxy?

  1. Jun 5, 2016 #1
    I was going through the following paper: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1605.08054.pdf

    In the 2nd line, it says, "GN-z11, a MUV=-21.1 galaxy at z=11.1."

    I know, what z=11.1 is. If I'm correct, it's the redshift of the galaxy which helps in measuring its velocity.

    I'm not quite sure, though, of what MUV is or why the galaxy is named GN-z11. Any help will be highly appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 5, 2016 #2

    Drakkith

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    I think it's the absolute magnitude in UV for the galaxy, but I'm not certain.
     
  4. Jun 5, 2016 #3
    Absolute magnitude as in brightness?
     
  5. Jun 5, 2016 #4

    Drakkith

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    That's right.
     
  6. Jun 5, 2016 #5

    phyzguy

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    Drakkith is right that MUV is the absolute magnitude in the UV,. As for the name, Wikipedia says,
    "The object's name is derived from its location in the GOODS-North field of galaxies and its high Doppler z-scale redshift number (GN + z11)"
     
  7. Jun 6, 2016 #6
    All right, though, why is the value negative?
     
  8. Jun 6, 2016 #7

    Drakkith

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