1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Courses What is the scope for aerospace engineering?

Tags:
  1. Jun 16, 2016 #1

    Titan97

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I am planning to join an undergraduate course in aerospace engineering. There are not much jobs in my country. I wish to do further studies in other countries (I don't want to stay here). I heard that getting jobs in other countries will be difficult because you need citizenship to work in their aerospace sector (clarification needed).
    1. What are the job opportunities in your country
    2. What are the options for further study after undergraduate course in aerospace engineering.
    (This is where I plan to join: http://www.ae.iitm.ac.in/index.htm)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 16, 2016 #2

    johnnyrev

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    My experience in aircraft is from the maintenance side, not the engineering, but I was heavily interested in aeronautical engineering at one time before my academic pursuits took me elsewhere, and I eventually served as a career adviser at a major university in Texas, USA for a time.

    When we speak the term "aerospace" it means what "aeronautical" used to convey, except that today low earth orbit is now considered a partial component. Most of the basic education, until you specialize, would focus on aerodynamics, mechanical engineering, mathematical analysis, with lab components including basic design, wind tunnel testing, stress loading, etc.

    It is in a way a "capstone" engineering science, bringing together multiple disciplines into one.

    If your math is outstanding, you will have no trouble. If your math is merely good, brush up now. My math skills were what kept me from pursuing this endeavor.

    In the US, there are major employers for aerospace (Boeing, Lockheed, Raytheon etc,) and there are many subcontractors that both supply them directly and provide contract maintenance for civilian airlines and the military. Different venture capitalists have launched their own private space ventures; close to my home, SpaceX has a rocket engine testing facility, and a division of Raytheon provides avionics refits and aerodynamics modifications.

    Boeing and Airbus are really competitive. They both are major project contractors, meaning they will take on huge aerospace projects and manage them, not just build airliners. I wonder if either of them would have a program to help an international student get an education either in their country of origin or the country where incorporated/manufactured/managed? They may even have been involved in some of India's recent space efforts, even if just lending a hand out of good will. It's not outside the realm of possibility. I'd look into it.

    Once you have all of the qualifications, a US work visa shouldn't be a problem, but I am not a member of US Immigration and am no authority on the matter.

    EDIT: Go here and read the thread on questions a US student has on becoming an AS engineer. They're a bit more basic, but there are two engineers with posts in it, Dr. Courtney, who has taught at the Air Force Academy, and boneh3ad, a Science Advisor, who is an aerospace engineer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2016
  4. Jun 17, 2016 #3

    Titan97

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    My math part is good. Boeing provides scholarship programs in some colleges here. (http://www.ae.iitkgp.ernet.in/boeing/index.htm [Broken])
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  5. Jun 17, 2016 #4

    johnnyrev

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Excellent, I knew one of the major manufacturers would have some interest in your chosen region. Keep that math on top. Fluid mechanics is a part of aerospace engineering, so the math will be difficult. As a maintenance guy, I was working with already established data. I've seen some of boneh3ad's discussion on here, and it is definitely out of my league. I'd maybe private message him for more advice.

    //edits for clarity//
     
  6. Jun 17, 2016 #5

    boneh3ad

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The issue or foreign nationals in the U.S. is that there is a sizable portion of the aerospace industry that is defense-related, and so foreign nationals have a very hard time getting into those positions. That said, there's a sizable civilian aerospace industry as well, so there are still opportunities. There are just fewer of them. If you become a permanent resident (green card) then more opportunities should be available, and even more will open up if you become a citizen.

    Regarding continuing education, there are plenty of options there. Nearly every program offering a BS in aerospace engineering also offers graduate degrees in the field. There are thesis-based and coursework-based options for master's degrees as well as the option of a Ph.D. You just have to settle on some career goals before making that decision, as the different degrees set you up for different outcomes.
     
  7. Jun 17, 2016 #6
    I don't think it's going to be that easy. Because of ITAR rules, this is not going to be a trivial task. US aerospace companies can't hire non-US citiziens easily, even if they want to. You need to be a US citizien to work in companies like Boeing, Lockheed, and obtaining a citizenship is a slow process that can take years.
    I did a lot of research into that, actually, as a non-US citizen.
     
  8. Jun 17, 2016 #7

    boneh3ad

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    This is why a lot of foreign students come here to attend graduate school in aerospace engineering. They can work on a degree while earning credit toward that time living in the country to eventually get their citizenship and open the door into all of those jobs. It's still a daunting task, though. The system wasn't designed to allow a large number of foreigners into those sorts of jobs, for better or worse. That said, I know people who have done it.
     
  9. Jun 18, 2016 #8

    Titan97

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I am not specific about US. The opportunities here in my country is less.

    I went through the syllabus of aerospace engineering. It seems interesting.

    What are "those sort of jobs"?

    @johnnyrev I like fluid mechanics. (I already did a course in fluids in high school and i liked it + I read articles in internet)
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2016
  10. Jun 18, 2016 #9

    boneh3ad

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I am simply only familiar with the US. Someone else here will have to chime in about other countries.

    Jobs working on weapon systems. In the US, as a foreign national, you won't really have the chance to work on fighter jets until you become a citizen, for example. You could still work on things like the Boeing 737 or engines and things like that as long as you can get someone to be willing to sponsor your visa.

    Dang, my high school didn't offer anything close to fluid mechanics.
     
  11. Jun 18, 2016 #10

    johnnyrev

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    The only class in my HS with the word "mechanics" was Power Mechanics, where we learned to fix snowmobiles.

    We did have the option to stay in an extra 13th year to enroll in A&P courses through the University of Alaska Fairbanks paid for by the school district, which I did :)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted