What is the torque on the bolt due to the worker and the weight of the beam?

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In summary, a steel beam with a length of 3.60 meters and a mass of 500 kilograms is bolted to a building under construction. At the far end of the beam, a construction worker with a mass of 70 kilograms stands. The magnitude of the torque around the bolt due to the worker and the weight of the beam is calculated by summing the torques around the bolt and considering the beam's mass to be located at its center. The total torque is 8820N*m, with 2469.6N*m coming from the worker and 6350.4N*m from the beam. The correct mass of the beam is 500kg.
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sp3sp2sp
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Homework Statement


A 3.60-m-long, 500 kg steel uniform beam extends horizontally from the point where it has been bolted to the framework of a new building under construction. A 70kg construction worker stands at the far end of the beam

What is the magnitude of the torque about the bolt due to the worker and the weight of the beam?
(there was no diagram)

Homework Equations


torque = m*d

The Attempt at a Solution


I just summed the torques around the bolt and considered the beam as having all its mass at its center:
torque from beam: t = 360kg(9.8)(1.8m) = 6350.4N*m
torque from person: t = 70kg(9.8)(3.6) = 2469.6N*m
2469.6N*m + 6350.4N*m = 8820N*m

Is this correct and is my reasoning about beam as having its mass at midpoint correct? thanks for any help
 
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  • #2
Yes but the beam is 500kg not 360kg
 

Related to What is the torque on the bolt due to the worker and the weight of the beam?

What is a summing torques problem?

A summing torques problem is a type of physics problem that involves calculating the net torque acting on an object in rotational motion. It is used to determine the rotational equilibrium of an object.

How do you solve a summing torques problem?

To solve a summing torques problem, you must first identify all the torques acting on the object and their respective magnitudes, directions, and points of application. Then, using the equation Στ = Iα, where Στ is the net torque, I is the moment of inertia, and α is the angular acceleration, you can determine the net torque acting on the object and solve for the unknown quantity.

What are the units of measurement for torque?

The units of measurement for torque are newton-meters (N·m) or foot-pounds (ft·lb). These units represent the product of force and distance, which are the two factors that determine the magnitude of torque.

Is it possible for the net torque to be zero in a summing torques problem?

Yes, it is possible for the net torque to be zero in a summing torques problem. This occurs when the object is in rotational equilibrium, meaning that it is not rotating or is rotating at a constant rate. In this case, the sum of all the torques acting on the object is equal to zero.

How is a summing torques problem different from a linear equilibrium problem?

A summing torques problem is different from a linear equilibrium problem in that it involves rotational motion, while a linear equilibrium problem involves translational motion. In a summing torques problem, the forces acting on an object cause it to rotate, while in a linear equilibrium problem, the forces acting on an object cause it to remain at rest or move at a constant velocity.

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