What Should I Use to Hold Bearings Vertically?

  • Thread starter StevenRice
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In summary, someone needs to hold the bearings vertically in a cylindrical magnet while the magnetic cylinder is spun horizontally.
  • #1
StevenRice
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I found perfect bearings for spinning this cylinder horizontally. But, I don't know what to use to hold the bearings, vertically I think.

Can someone please try to tell me what I should use to hold these bearings?

 
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  • #2
It looks like your cylindrical rod is magnetic?

It also looks like the white things are already holding the ball bearings, no? You want something to fix the white things in the vertical axis?
 
  • #3
And this looks like the same project that you posted 2 years ago, but the thread was locked because you did not want to give more details to help us help you...?

StevenRice said:
I won't be able to tell you everything you say you need. Because I fear that someone might steal my ideas.
 
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  • #4
StevenRice said:
I found perfect bearings for spinning this cylinder horizontally.
Perfection is the enemy of progress, which might explain why you have been working on the project for over two years.

StevenRice said:
But, I don't know what to use to hold the bearings, vertically I think.
Think outside the box. Do you want the axis of rotation to be horizontal or vertical?

Those bearings sound quite noisy, will they be lubricated and if so, how will the lubrication be kept in and the dirt be kept out? What RPM do you need to allow for?

What is the bearing part number, and what is the outer race of the bearing made from, is it ceramic, PTFE, or something else?

StevenRice said:
Can someone please try to tell me what I should use to hold these bearings?
That will depend on the relationship between the cylinder and the structure you are building. How will the cylinder be driven to rotate, and what side and axial forces will then be carried by the bearings and supports?
 
  • #5
StevenRice said:
I won't be able to tell you everything you say you need. Because I fear that someone might steal my ideas. But, I can answer some questions.
1. I can't tolerate any vibration
2.+3. I have no idea what the RPM will be. I might be trying to use a cordless drill to spin it. But, nevermind.
1) The bearings shown in the video will have terrible vibration because they are a sloppy loose fit on the shaft. If you think that those bearings are good enough, then your system can tolerate fairly high vibration.

2) 100 RPM, 1000 RPM, 10,000 RPM, and 100,000 RPM all have different bearing requirements. If you have no idea of the speed, then you have no ideas worth stealing.

3) In order to support a shaft with bearings, it is necessary to know at least approximately the weight, speed, external loads, environment, and allowable shaft movement in both radial and axial directions. It is possible to specify all of these without giving out any proprietary information.

Baluncore said:
That suggests you are so far behind, that you think you are first.
This quote from your thread of two years ago still applies.

berkeman said:
And this looks like the same project that you posted 2 years ago, but the thread was locked because you did not want to give more details to help us help you...?
As will this thread if you do not start properly responding to the feedback you have been given in both this thread and the earlier one.
 
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  • #6
berkeman said:
It looks like your cylindrical rod is magnetic?

It also looks like the white things are already holding the ball bearings, no? You want something to fix the white things in the vertical axis?
Yes, the cylinder is a magnet. The white things are the bearings, I think. I believe that I want to hold the bearings in the vertical axis. So, I can spin the magnet in the horizontal axis. Honestly, I have no idea what the RPM's will need to be. And, this is not part of a structure that will be holding anything. I'm just trying to get the cylinder to spin. I might just use a cordless drill to spin it.

And, yeah, I have had this idea for years now. But, I have had a child born in the meantime. My daughter is now my priority. This is just a side project.

I just tried to hold the bearings with 2 Vise grips, laying on the table. But, it didn't work. How else can I hold the bearings?
 
  • #7
StevenRice said:
The white things are the bearings, I think.
Statements like this will not get you much help here. I truly don't mean to sound offensive but it seems you know so little about what you are trying to do that it is all but impossible to help you in an internet forum setting. Please realize that there is nothing wrong with being new and green at something. No one is born knowing these things.
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All that being said, I'm going to assume your project is a hobby or proof of concept. Not knowing how fast the cylinder will rotate implies not much effort is being put into this on your part, don't expect much from us.
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Bearings are typically fixed to the shaft by a press fit, set screws, or an eccentric locking collar which will also have set screws. Naturally you have to live within the constraints of what is available and choose a shaft diameter that matches the bearing. The outer race of a bearing is typically a press fit or spherical. The spherical will fit into what is known as a pillow block. They also will fit into split flanges that bolt together with the same fasteners that attach it to what is to be mounted to. This is a very basic summary of what you can do. It's now up to you to determine the forces acting upon the bearings. I suspect the only way you will make headway here is to accept that you may have some failures. Keep in mind failure can involve your safety as well as others. Good luck.
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Edit:
There are many other different types of bearings, some specialized. I thought I'd mention the types that you are most likely to use.
 
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  • #8
StevenRice said:
Yes, the cylinder is a magnet. The white things are the bearings, I think. I believe that I want to hold the bearings in the vertical axis. So, I can spin the magnet in the horizontal axis.
The bearing assemblies that you show are radial bearings, so they provide no support in the thrust axis. What are you planning on using to keep the rod from falling out of the radial bearing assemblies?

1675188326504.png

https://monroeengineering.com/blog/radial-vs-thrust-bearings-whats-the-difference/
 
  • #9
StevenRice said:
I'm just trying to get the cylinder to spin. I might just use a cordless drill to spin it.
StevenRice said:
I can't tolerate any vibration
These two statements are not compatible. To the people on this forum who are responding, the second statement implies sub micron precision and noiseless operation at speeds that could exceed 10,000 RPM.

The first statement implies that you can make it do what you want with some really simple, and quite sloppy, bearings. It also implies that it only needs to work long enough to test your idea. Your limited descriptions also imply a very low load, less than a few pounds on each bearing. If these assumptions are correct, your bearing could be as simple as two blocks of wood, with a hole drilled through each block. Clamp the blocks to your table, insert your shaft, connect the cordless drill, and spin it. The drill controls the axial position.

And yes, I have experience with wood block bearings from a long time ago when I used them to build unpowered go-carts. Nail two boards together with the grain at 90 degrees, saw them round, and drill a hole in the middle for the axle. I used a snow shovel for a sail on a windy day, and went fast enough to outrun some friends on foot.

berkeman said:
And this looks like the same project that you posted 2 years ago, but the thread was locked because you did not want to give more details to help us help you...?
And this statement still applies. You really need to give us enough information to help if you want useable help.
 
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  • #10
jrmichler said:
And yes, I have experience with wood block bearings from a long time ago when I used them to build unpowered go-carts. Nail two boards together with the grain at 90 degrees, saw them round, and drill a hole in the middle for the axle. I used a snow shovel for a sail on a windy day, and went fast enough to outrun some friends on foot.
Were they still your friends after you embarrassed them like that? :wink:
 
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  • #11
Of course. As long as they got to ride it also.

One friend persuaded his mother to take it and us to a local park that had a paved hill with minimal traffic. Wood wheels have low friction against pavement, so we could get rolling, then do drifts and spinouts. And the wheels rumbled really well.
 
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  • #12
jrmichler said:
I used a snow shovel for a sail on a windy day, and went fast enough to outrun some friends on foot.
Lol. How often can anyone read that on the internet?
 
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  • #13
Machine grooves in relevent places on the shaft and use circlips
 
  • #14
Joe591 said:
Machine grooves in relevent places on the shaft and use circlips
There are so many ways if doing this job. A length of threaded rod and two nuts with washers could hold the inner ring of the bearing. The ends of the rod would be easy to fit in something else.

etc. etc. but without some more clues about what the final job would look like, it's pretty much impossible to help you. If you have some idea of a commercially viable item then you will need to take on a partner with a bit more practical knowledge and equipment than you do.

I'm always tinkering around with these sort of little projects but I have most of the tools and the skills are increasing all the time. I'm not looking for a partner though.
 

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