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What species does this insect belong to?

  1. Nov 9, 2018 #1
    I just found this insect and I don't know what is it. It seems to be the larva of a fly or maybe a little butterfly. I live in Spain so it is fall. What should I do with it?

    insect.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 9, 2018 #2
    This may be some kind of moth larvae.By the way,what is the substance around it?
     
  4. Nov 9, 2018 #3

    Lord Jestocost

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    It might be the larva of a carpet beetle.
     
  5. Nov 9, 2018 #4

    BillTre

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    Looks somewhat like a pillbug (an isopod, not an insect) to me, but can't really tell from the picture.

    Need more information:
    Where did you find it?
    Size?
    Is it aquatic or terrestrial (can't tell from picture)?
    Does it have legs? How many? Insects have 6 legs when mature.
    Is it flat or round in cross section?
     
  6. Nov 10, 2018 #5
    It's in a cristal plate. I took the picture with the smartphone's camera through a x21 microscope
     
  7. Nov 10, 2018 #6
    I found it in the wall of my room (I live in a flat near a river)
    It's about 4-5 mm long and 1'5 mm wide.
    It seems to be terrestrial.
    It has 6 legs in the upper half and it's yellowish white below.
    The shape is like a flattened cylinder.

    I dont want to leave it on the street how I fed it? :cry:
     
  8. Nov 10, 2018 #7

    BillTre

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    Could be an insect larvae.

    You would have to know what it eats to feed it.
    Figuring that out might be pretty difficult. Larvae and adults often eat different things.
    It would probably do best if you put it outside, on some vegetation.
    Then it might find its food on its own. It what animals do.
     
  9. Nov 10, 2018 #8

    256bits

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  10. Nov 11, 2018 #9
    Thank you very much!!
    I also read that they live much more longer in low temperatures so I'm moving it to the window's ledge, waiting for the spring. "Adults feed on the pollen and nectar of flowering plants" according wikipedia.
    Thanks to this discovery now I will know what to do if see more of them in my home :rolleyes:
     
  11. Nov 16, 2018 at 3:04 AM #10

    256bits

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    Well, the thanks should go to @Lord Jestocost for coming up with the ID suggestion.
     
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